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Town of 



ORFORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Annual 
Report 



For the Year Ended December 31^ 1997 



Annual Report 

of the 

Officers 

of the 

TOWN 

of 

ORFORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 



for the 



Year Ending December 31, 1997 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Table of Contents 2 

Town Directory 3 

Town Officers 4 

Minutes of Annual Town Meeting, March 12, 1996 , 7 

Warrant 15 

Budget 20 

Budget Advisory Committee Report 24 

Summary of Disbursements by Order of Selectmen: 25 

Statement of Appropriations and Taxes 43 

Summary Inventory of Valuation 46 

Department of Revenue Administration Tax Rate Calculation 48 

Schedule of Town Property 49 

Statement of Bonded Debt 50 

Town Reports: 

Auditor's Certificate 51 

Cemetery Commissioners' Report 60 

Dog License Fees 57 

Emergency Management Director's Report 61 

Fire Department Report 62 

Fire Warden and State Forest Ranger's Report 63 

Highway Department's Report 64 

Library Reports: Free Library 65 

Social Library 67 

Niles Committee Report 69 

Planning Board Report 70 

Police Department Report 71 

Selectmen's Report 58 

Ski Program Report 73 

Swim Program Report 74 

Tax Collector's Report 53 

Town Clerk's Report 55 

Treasurer's Report 52 

Vital Statistics: Births, Marriages, Deaths 109 

Nonprofit Group Reports: 

Connecticut River Joint Commissions 75 

Executive Council Report 81 

Grafton County Senior Citizen's Council 76 

Upper Valley Ambulance 77 

Upper Valley Lake Sunapee Regional Planning Commission 79 

Visiting Nurse Alliance of Vermont and New Hampshire 80 

Orford School District Report: 

Table of Contents 84 



TOWN DIRECTORY 

SELECTMEN'S MEETING 

Every Wednesday at 7:30 PM at the Town Office, Route 25A 

SELECTMEN'S OFFICE 353-4889 

Gail Shipman, Administrative Assistant 
Office Hours: Monday 9:00-12:00 

Wednesday 5:00 - 7:30 
Thursday 12:00 - 2:30 

The Selectmen's Office is in the Town Office. 

TOWN CLERK 353-4404 

Deborah Williams-Matyka 

Office Hours: Tuesday 6:00 - 8:00 

Wednesday 6:00 - 8:00 

Thursday 6:00 - 8:00 

2nd and 4th Saturday 9:00 - 12:00 

The Town Clerk's Office is in the Town Office. 

TAX COLLECTOR 353-4831 

Louise Mack 

Office Hours: Daily after 5:00 PM (Please call first.) 

The Tax Collector's Office is in her home on Archertown Road. 

PLANNING BOARD MEETING 

Every third Monday at 7:00 PM at the Town Office. 



ORFORD TOWN OFFICERS 



Elected by nonpartisan ballot on Town Meeting Day: 



MODERATOR 



Peter M. Thomson 




353-4111 1998 


2-Year Term 






SELECTMEN 




Timothy Chase 




353-4880 1998 


3- Year Term 


David Bischoff 




353-9818 1999 


3- Year Term 


Paul Goundrey 




353-9813 2000 
TREASURER 


3- Year Term 


Charles Peters 




353-4508 1998 


3- Year Term 




SUPERVISORS OF THE CHECKLIST 




Laura Verry 




353-9450 1998 


6- Year Term 


Andrew Schwaegler 




272-9202 2000 


6-Year Term 


Vacant 




2002 
TAX COLLECTOR 


6-Year Term 


Louise Mack 




353-4831 1998 
TOWN CLERK 


1 -Year Term 


Deborah Williams-Matyka 


353-4404 1999 


3- Year Term 






ROAD AGENT 




James Fields 




353-9366 1998 
PLANNING BOARD 


1 -Year Term 


Paul Dalton 




353-9844 1998 


3-Year Term 


Jonathan Sands 




353-4746 1998 


3- Year Term 


Andrew Schwaegler 




272-9202 1999 


3- Year Term 


Shawn Washburn 




353-4207 1999 


3- Year Term 


Elizabeth Bischoff 




353-4526 2000 


3- Year Term 


David Coker 




353-4104 2000 


3- Year Term 


Guy Hebb 




353-4848 


Alternate 


David Bischoff 




353-9818 


Ex Officio 


Timothy Chase 




353-4880 


Ex Officio Alt 


Nominated and Elected from the floor on Town Meeting Day: 








AUDITOR 




Joseph Arcolio 




353-9504 1998 


1 -Year Term 




OVERSEERS OF PUBLIC WELFARE 




Board of Selectmen 




353-4889 1998 


1 -Year Term 



Orford Town Officers (continued) 



Mark Marsh 

H. Norton Washburn 



FENCE VIEWERS 

353-9007 1998 

353-4570 1998 



1 -Year Term 
1 -Year Term 



David Bischoff 



HEALTH OFFICER 

353-9818 1998 



1 -Year Term 



SEXTON 



Cemetery Commission 



1998 



BUDGET ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Ann Davis 



ORFORD SOCIAL LIBRARY TRUSTEE 

353-4881 1998 



1 -Year Term 



James Hook 


353-4834 


1998 


1 -Year Term 


Jim McGoff 


353-4835 


1998 


1 -Year Term 


Robert Palifka 


353-9367 


1998 


1 -Year Term 


Andrew Schwaegler 


272-9202 


1998 


1 -Year Term 


Herbert Verry 


353-9450 


1998 


1 -Year Term 




ORFORD FREE LIBRARY TRUSTEES 




Juli Washburn 


353-4207 


1998 


3- Year Term 


Susan Kling 




1999 


3-Year Term 


Carol Boynton 


353-4874 


2000 


3- Year Term 



3- Year Term 



Arthur Dennis 
James Hook 
Larry Taylor 



Dave Thomson 
John O'Brien 
Ranson Perry 
Randy Fillian 
Brad McCormack 



Larry Taylor 
Julia Fifield 
Vacant 
John O'Brien 
George (Pat) Tullar 



FIRE WARDS 

353-4502 1998 

353-4834 1998 

353-9865 1998 

PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS 



353-9607 


1998 


353-9857 


1999 


353-4793 


1999 


353-9059 


2000 


353-4469 


2000 


FIVATION CO 

353-9865 


MMISSK 

1998 


353-4881 


1999 




1999 


353-9857 


2000 


353-4120 


2000 



1 -Year Term 
1 -Year Term 
1 -Year Term 



3- Year Term 
3- Year Term 
3- Year Term 
3- Year Term 
3- Year Term 



3-Year Term 
3- Year Term 
3- Year Term 
3- Year Term 
3- Year Term 



Orford Town Officers (continued) 



Cicely Richardson 
IVIark Blanchard 
Bruce Schwaegler 



Julia Fifield 
Paul Messer 
Ruth Brown 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

353-4608 1998 

353-9873 1999 

272-4950 2000 

CEMETERY COMMISSION 

353-4881 1998 

353-4883 1999 

353-9092 2000 



3- Year Term 
3- Year Term 
3-Year Term 



3-Year Term 
3- Year Term 
3- Year Term 



Appointed by the Board of Selectmen: 



Arthur Dennis 



FIRE CHIEF 

353-4502 



1998 



1 -Year Term 



Michael LaChapelle 



Rita Pease 



POLICE CHIEF 

353-4252 1998 1 -Year Term 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR 

353-9070 1 998 1 -Year Term 



INSPECTORS OF ELECTION 



Elizabeth Bischoff 
Judith Parker 
Julie Peters 
Glyneta Thomson 
Elizabeth Blauvelt (Alternate) 
Ruth Brown (Alternate) 



Elizabeth Bischoff 

Paul Boone 

Barbara Dyke 

David Coker 

Timothy Chase (ex officio) 



353-4526 


1998 




1998 


353-4508 


1998 


353-4547 


1998 


) 353-4115 


1998 


353-9092 


1998 


NILES FUND COMMITTEE 


353-4526 


1998 


353-4571 


1998 


353-9885 


1998 


353-4104 


1998 


353-4880 


1998 



2- Year Term 
2- Year Term 
2- Year Term 
2-Year Term 
2-Year Term 
2-Year Term 



1 -Year Term 
1 -Year Term 
1 -Year Term 
1 -Year Term 
1 -Year Term 



TOWN OF ORFORD 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING MINUTES 

March 11, 1997 



GRAFTON, ss. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 



The polls were opened at 4:05 p.m. The ballots were counted (518) and the voting 
began for the Town Officers on the Australian Ballot. 

The Annual Town Meeting for the Town of Orford was called to order at 7:13 p.m. 
Moderator Peter Thomson led the assembly in the salute to the Flag. The Moderator 
proceeded to introduce the Orford Chief of Police, Michael LaChappelle, along with 
some announcements concerning the Orford Historical Society exhibit at the back of 
the hall, the Mud Season Yard Sale sponsored by the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee, vacancies on the SAU Study Committee, a vacancy on the Supervisor of 
the Checklist, which of these positions need to be filled, and general housekeeping items. 

The Moderator proceeded to read the posting of the Warrant which was posted and 
certified on February 6, 1997 by the Board of Selectmen: David Bischoff, Timothy R. 
Chase and Paul J. Goundrey. 

A motion was made by Paul Messer, Sr. and seconded by David Bischoff to dispense 
with the reading of the Warrant and was passed with a voice vote in affirmation. 



ARTICLE 1 : To choose all necessary Town Officers. 
Officers to be elected from the floor: 

For one year: AUDITOR 

For one year: OVERSEERS OF PUBLIC WELFARE 

For one year: FENCE VIEWERS 

For one year: HEALTH OFFICER 

For one year: SEXTON 

For one year: BUDGET COMMITTEE 



Joseph Arcolio 

Selectmen 

Mark Marsh 

H. Horton Washburn 

David Bischoff 

Cemetery Commission 

James Hook 
Jim McGoff 
Robert Palifka 
Andrew Schwaegler 
Herbert Verry 



For three years: ORFORD FREE LIBRARY TRUSTEE Carol Boynton 



For one year: FIRE WARDS Arthur Dennis 

James Hook 
Larry Taylor 

For three years: PARKS & PLAYGROUNDS David Braley 

Randy Fillian 

For three years: CONSERVATION COMMITTEE John O'Brien 

George (Pat) Tullar 

For three years: TRUSTEE OF TRUST FUNDS Bruce Schwaegler 

For three years: CEMETERY COMMISSION Ruth Brown 

ARTICLE 2: 

To see if the Town will adopt the provisions of RSA 466:30-a which make it unlawful 
for any dog to run at large, except when accompanied by the owner or custodian, and 
when used for hunting, herding, supervised competition and exhibition or training 
for such? 

Yes: 167 No: 97 

The article was passed. 

ARTICLES: 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $420,497.00 to include 


the following budget items: 




GENERAL GOVERNMENT 




Executive 


$30,100. 


Election 


13,000. 


Financial Administration 


15,500. 


Revaluation of Property 


750. 


Legal Expenses 


20,000. 


Planning 


5,510. 


General Government Buildings 


7,000. 


Cemeteries 


6,750. 


Insurance 


12,000. 


Regional Association 


937. 


Personnel Administration 


23,000. 


Contingency Fund 


. 3,000. 


PUBLIC SAFETY 




Police 


$ 33,605. 


Ambulance 


14,112. 


Fire Department 


17,700. 


Emergency Management 


300. 


HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 




Highways 


$113,610. 


Bridges 


6,000. 


Street Lighting 


4,300. 



8 



SANITATION 





Solid Waste Collection 




$ 4,940. 




Solid Waste Disposal 




30,000. 


HEALTH 










Pest Control 




$ 1,350. 




Health Agency 




5,225. 


WELFARE 










Direct Assistance 




$ 4,550. 




Intergovernmental Welfare 


1,400. 


CULTURE AND RECREATION 








Parks and Playgrounds 




$ 11,800. 




Libraries 




12,720. 




Patriotic Purposes 




175. 


CONSERVATION 








Other Conservation 




$ 125. 


DEBT SERVICE 








Principal — Long Term 


Bonds 


$10,000. 




Interest — Long Term Bonds 


2,069. 




Interest — Tax Anticipa 


tion Note 


2,500. 



CAPITAL OUTLAY 

Buildings 

Building Improvements $ 1,500. 

Improvements Other Than Buildings 

Restoration of Town Records 2,069. 

Fire Department Radios 2,400. 

Office Equipment 500. 

A motion was made by David Bischoff and seconded by Paul Goundrey. After some 
explanation from Selectman David Bischoff, it was voted to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $420,497.00 by voice affirmation. 

The article was passed. 

ARTICLE 4: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $56,000.00 for payments 
to capital reserve funds to be disbursed as follows: 

Fire Truck $ 20,000. 

Town Truck #2 8,000. 

Grader 6,000. 

Loader 7,000. 

Bridge Replacement 10,000. 

Police Cruiser 4,000. 

Tractor- Mower 1,000. 

A motion was made by Paul Goundrey and seconded by David Bischoff. It was voted 
by voice affirmation to disburse payments to the capital reserve funds as stated above. 

The article was passed. 



ARTICLE 5: 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $20,000.00 for 
paving projects. 

A motion was made by Paul Goundrey and seconded by David Bischoff. After much 
discussion the motion was passed by voice affirmation. 

The article was passed. 

ARTICLES: 

To see if the Town will vote to establish pursuant to RSA 35:1 a capital reserve fund 
for the purchase of trucks for the Highway Department, to be known as the Highway 
Department Truck Capital Reserve Fund. 

A motion was made by David Bischoff and seconded by Gete Thomson, a voice vote 
in the affirmation. 

The article was passed. 

ARTICLE?: 

To see if the Town will vote to discontinue the Town Truck #1 Capital Reserve Fund 
and the Town Truck #2 Capital Reserve Fund as provided in RSA 35:16-a. 

A motion was made by David Bischoff and seconded by Paul Goundrey, a voice vote 
in the affirmation. 



The article was passed. 

ARTICLES: 

To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $58,606.84 plus accrued inter- 
est to be paid into the Highway Department Truck Capital Reserve Fund. This sum 
represents the amount formerly in the Town Truck #1 and Town Truck #2 Capital 
Reserve Funds. 

A motion was made by Paul Goundrey and seconded by Gete Thomson, a voice vote 
in the affirmation. 

The article was passed. 

ARTICLE 9: 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the sum of $68,000.00 for the purpose of 
purchasing a new truck for the Highway department, and to name the Selectmen as 
agents of the Town to withdraw $55,000.00 from the Highway Department Capital 
Reserve Fund to be used for the purchase of the new truck and raise the balance of 
$13,000.00 by general taxation. 

A motion was made by Paul Goundrey and seconded by Pat Hammond. After some 
discussion there was a voice vote in the affirmation. 

The article was passed. 



10 



ARTICLE 10: 

To see if the Town will raise and appropriate the sum of $20,000.00 for the purpose of 
hiring additional part-time personnel and for contracted services on town roads. 

A motion was made by Gete Thomson and seconded by Paul Messer, Sr. After a great 
deal of discussion there was a voice vote in the affirmation. 

The article was passed. 

ARTICLE 11: 

To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the interest, $5,000.00 from the Lenore 
Niles Trust Fund for the purpose of planting trees on town owned property, improving 
community facilities and sponsoring organizations of Orford with financial aid for 
opportunities that otherwise might be unattainable. 

A motion was made by Julia Fifield and seconded by Paul Goundrey. After little 
discussion, a voice vote in the affirmation. 

The article was passed. 

ARTICLE 12: 

To see if the Town will vote to modify the elderly exemptions from property tax in the 
Town of Orford, based on assessed value, for qualified taxpayers, to be as follows: for 
a person 65 years of age up to 75 years of age, $5,000; for a person 75 years of age 
up to 80 years of age, $10,000; for a person 80 years of age or older, $20,000. To 
qualify, the person must have been a New Hampshire resident for at least five years, 
own the real estate individually or jointly, or if the real estate is owned by such person's 
spouse, they must have been married for at least 5 years. In addition, the taxpayer 
must have a net income, if single, of not more than $15,000 or, if married, a combined 
net income of less than $23,000, and own net assets not in excess of $35,000, excluding 
the value of the person's residence. 

A motion was made by David Bischoff and seconded by Paul Goundrey. After some 
explanation of the requirements by Selectman David Bischoff a paper ballot was cast. 

Yes: 85 No: 14 

The article was passed. 

ARTICLE 13: 

To see if the Town will vote to modify the Section 218 agreement currently held with 
the State of New Hampshire to reflect the changes made to the Social Security 
Independence and Program Act of 1994 which raised the exclusion for election work- 
ers to less than $1,000 annually for services performed by election workers for the 
Town of Orford. 

A motion was made by Paul Goundrey and seconded by David Bischoff. The 
motion was passed by an affirmative voice vote. 

The article was passed. 



11 



ARTICLE 14: 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of RSA 202-A:4-c providing 
that any town at an annual meeting may adopt an article authorizing indefinitely, until 
specific rescission of such authority, the public library trustees to apply for, accept and 
expend, without further action by the town meeting, unanticipated money from a state, 
federal or other governmental unit or a private source which becomes available 
during the fiscal year. 

A motion was made by Julia Fifield and seconded by David Bischoff. After little 
discussion, the motion was passed by a voice vote in affirmation. 

The article was passed. 

ARTICLE 15: 

To see if the Town will vote to adopt the provisions of RSA 202-A:4-d authorizing, 
indefinitely, until specific rescission of such authority, the library trustees to accept gifts 
of personal property, other than money, which may be offered to the library for any 
public purpose, provided, however, that no acceptance of personal property by the 
library shall be deemed to bind the town or the library trustees to raise, appropriate or 
expend any public funds for the operation, maintenance, repair or replacement of such 
personal property. 

A motion was made by David Bischoff and seconded by Paul Goundrey, there was 
a voice affirmation vote 

The article was passed. 

ARTICLE 16: 

To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to apply for and receive Federal 
Disaster Assistance Funds through the State Disaster Coordination Office and to 
expend the funds so received to repair the damage done to town roads and/or bridges 
caused by any disaster for which federal funds are available. 

A motion was made by David Bischoff and seconded by Paul Goundrey. After some 
discussion, the motion was passed in a voice affirmation vote. 

The article was passed. 

ARTICLE 17: 

To hear the reports of Agents, Auditors and Committees heretofore chosen and to 
pass any vote relating thereto. 

A motion was made by Teke Tomlinson and seconded by David Bischoff to pass 
over this article. There was a voice affirmation vote. 

ARTICLE 18: 

To transact any other business that may legally come before said meeting. 

Sheila Perry asked the Selectmen if there was any more news about the 911 system. 



12 



The Selectmen replied that the 911 map is still not completed by the State and hope 
to have this information within 6 months to a year. 

Toni Pease asked the Selectmen is there any way to attract some new business to our 
Town to help the economy. Selectmen Paul Goundrey reported that he would be 
attending a Grafton County Economic Development meeting concerning this issue. 

The business portion of the Town Meeting was completed at 8:55 p.m. The ballot 
box was closed at 9:02 p.m. and the Supervisors of the Checklist and Ballot 
Clerks proceeded to count the ballots for the elected Town Officers. 

SELECTMAN: Three-Year Term 

165 - Paul Goundrey; 

Write-ins: Larry Norton - 22; Paul Messer - 9; Mark Marsh - 5; 
Larry Taylor - 5; Harold Taylor - 4; Bill Wilson - 3; Chase Kling - 2; 
Andy Schwaegler - 2; Rendell Tullar - 2; Charlie Waterbury - 2; 
Larry Hibbard, Dick Hendrick, Robert Palifka, Charles Clifford, 
Dan Daisey, Bruce Streeter, Jane Hebb, David Thomson, Don Davis, 
Jay Gordon, Randy Perry, Charlie Parker, Joyce McKee, Gary Mosley, 
Paul Boone, John Sands, Linda Aldrich, Ron Taylor, Roger Hadlock, 
Judy Franklin, Terry Dyke, Jim McGoff, and Jim Fields each had 
one vote. 

TAX COLLECTOR: One-Year Term 
263 - Louise M. Mack 

PLANNING BOARD MEMBERS: Three-Year Term 

213 -Elizabeth Bischoff; 

Write-ins: Jon Sands - 18; Paul Messer - 5; Quentin Mack - 2; 
Lori Raynes, Steve Hook, Dan Daisey, Larry Sargent, Chase Kling, 
Harold Taylor, Robb Thomson, Calvin Dyke, and Bill Wilson each had 
one vote. 

PLANNING BOARD MEMBER: Three-Year Term 

20 - David Coker; 

Write-ins: Jon Sands - 8; Quentin Mock - 5; Chase Kling - 5; 
Judy Franklin, Bill Wilson, Andy Schwaegler, and Paul Messer each 
had three votes; Gete Thomson, Tom Thomson, Shawn Washburn, 
John O'Brien, Carl Schmidt, Tom Trunzo, Julia Fifield, and 
Stacy Thomson each had two votes; Jim McGoff, Joe Arcolio, 
Rendell Tullar, Bryson Beeson, Carol Boynton, Ron Taylor, 
Charles Clifford, David Thomson, Dan Daisey, Peter Thomson, 
Mark Blanchard, Larry Taylor, Guy Hebb, Emily Bryant, Randy Perry, 
Larry Sargent, Robert Palifka, Scott Marsh, Harold Taylor, 



13 



Dick Hendricks, Calvin Dyke, Floyd Marsh, Forrest Bunten, 
Jenny Littlewood, Rose Angwin, Sheila Thomson, Debra Hawthorne, 
Marion Jones, Richard Hill, Jim Hook, Linda Gordon, Susan Taylor, 
Charlie Parker, and Larry Norton each had one vote. 

ROAD AGENT: One-Year Term 
51 - Peter Angwin; 
214- James E. Fields; 
Write-ins: David Thomson and Floyd Marsh each had one vote. 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:59 p.m. The ballots were sealed at 10:05 p.m. 

The foregoing is a true copy. 

Attest: Deborah A. Williams-Matyka, Town Clerk 



14 



TOWN OF ORFORD 
STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING WARRANT 

1998 

TO THE INHABITANTS OF THE TOWN OF ORFORD, County of Grafton, in said 
state, qualified to vote on Town Affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at Memorial Hall in said Orford on Tuesday the 10th 
of March next at seven o'clock in the evening to act on the following subjects: 

ARTICLE 1. 

To choose all necessary Town Officers. The polls will be open from four o'clock in the 
afternoon and will close no earlier than nine o'clock in the evening for you to cast your 
ballot for the following officers: 



Moderator 


2-Year Term 


Selectman 


3-Year Term 


Treasurer 


3- Year Term 


Supervisor of the Checklist 


6- Year Term 


Supervisor of the Checklist 


4- Year Term 


Tax Collector 


1 -Year Term 


Road Agent 


1 -Year Term 


Planning Board Member 


3- Year Term 


Planning Board Member 


3-Year Term 


and to vote for anything that may be on your 


ballot. 



ARTICLE 2. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $432,436 (four 
hundred thirty-two thousand, four hundred thirty-six) to include the following 
budget items: 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Executive $ 32,660. 

Election 15,325. 

Financial Administration 17,550. 

Revaluation of Property 1 ,600. 

Legal Expenses 8,000. 

Personnel Administration 20,820. 

Planning Board 5,450. 

General Government Buildings 7,050. 

Cemeteries 7,900. 

Insurance 11,275. 

Regional Association 937. 

Contingency Fund 3,000. 



15 



PUBLIC SAFETY 




Police 


$ 38,749. 


Ambulance 


14,112. 


Fire Department 


17,125. 


Emergency Management 


300. 


HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES 




Highways 


$120,422 


Bridges 


6,000. 


Street Lighting 


4,400. 


SANITATION 


- 


Solid Waste Collection 


$ 4,780. 


Solid Waste Disposal 


31,370. 


HEALTH 




Pest Control 


$ 1,310. 


Health Agency 


5,250. 


WELFARE 




Direct Assistance 


$ 4,550. 


Intergovernmental Welfare 


1 ,480. 


CULTURE AND RECREATION 




Parks and Playgrounds 


$ 12,575. 


Libraries 


15,570. 


Patriotic Purposes 


125. 


CONSERVATION 




Other Conservation 


$ 125. 


DEBT SERVICE 




Principal — Long Term Bonds 


$10,000. 


Interest — Long Term Bonds 


4,725. 


Interest — Tax Anticipation Note 


2,500. 



CAPITAL OUTLAY 

Buildings 

Building Improvements $ 1,500. 

Improvements Other Than Buildings 

Restoration of Town Records 2,401 . 
Fire Department Radios 1,500. 

ARTICLE 3. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $56,000 (fifty-six 
thousand dollars) for payments to capital reserve funds to be disbursed as follows: 



Fire Truck 

Town Truck #2 

Grader 

Loader 

Bridge Replacement 

Police Cruiser 

Tractor- Mower 

(The Selectmen recommend this article.) 



$ 20,000. 
8,000. 
6,000. 
7,000. 
10,000. 
4,000. 
1 ,000. 



16 



(NOTE: Under RSA 32:5 V. the Selectmen are required to indicate whether or not they 
approve of an appropnation which appears as part of a separate warrant article. The 
notation at the end of the following money articles gives the opinion of the majority of 
the Board.) 

ARTICLE 4. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $30,000 (thirty 
thousand dollars) for the purpose of purchasing and equipping a new cruiser for the 
police department, and to name the Selectmen as agents of the Town to withdraw 
$20,000 (twenty thousand dollars) from the Police Cruiser Capital Reserve Fund and 
authorize the Selectmen to trade in the present police cruiser. (The Selectmen 
recommend this article.) 

ARTICLE 5. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $60,000 (sixty 
thousand dollars) for the purpose of repairing the Brook Road bridge and to name the 
Selectmen as agents of the Town to withdraw $60,000 (sixty thousand dollars) from 
the Bridges and Roads Capital Reserve Fund to pay for said project. (The Selectmen 
recommend this article.) 

ARTICLE 6. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $20,000 (twenty 
thousand dollars) for the purpose of hiring additional part-time personnel and for 
contracted services on town roads. (The Selectmen recommend this article.) 

ARTICLE 7. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $13,000 (thirteen 
thousand dollars) to replace the culverts and raise the roadbed on Prettyman Road. 
(The Selectmen recommend this article.) 

ARTICLE 8. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $24,000 (twenty-four 
thousand dollars) for paving projects. (The Selectmen recommend this article.) 

ARTICLE 9. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $9,000 (nine thousand 
dollars) to make repairs to Creamery Road. (The Selectmen recommend this article.) 

ARTICLE 10. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $6,900 (six thousand 
nine hundred dollars) for a new computer system for the town clerk's office. New 
Hampshire town clerk and motor vehicle software and cash receipts/dog license 
software. (The Selectmen recommend this article.) 



17 



ARTICLE 11. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $4,000 (four thousand 
dollars) for a professional audit of the town accounts. (The Selectmen recommend 
this article.) 

ARTICLE 12. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1 ,026 (one thousand 
twenty-six dollars) ($1 .00 per capita) to pay for certain studies of electric load profiles 
within the Town and other related research in furtherance of the possible aggregation 
of the Town's and/or its residents' and businesses' electric loads in the NHMA 
Pooled Energy Plan in preparation for deregulation of the electric industry in New 
Hampshire. (The Selectmen recommend this article.) 

ARTICLE 13. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1 ,026 (one thousand 
twenty-six dollars) to help fund a household hazardous waste collection day being 
planned by the North Country Council. (The Selectmen recommend this article.) 

ARTICLE 14. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the interest, $5,000 (five thousand 
dollars), from the Lenore Niles Trust Fund for the purpose of planting trees on town 
owned property, improving community facilities and sponsoring organizations of 
Orford with financial aid for opportunities that otherwise might be unattainable. (The 
Selectmen recommend this article.) 

ARTICLE 15. 

To see if the Town will vote to designate Piermont Heights Road from the 
Orford/Piermont town line to its intersection with Bear Tree Road as a highway to 
summer cottages, as provided in RSA 231 :81 . 

ARTICLE 16. 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Alcoholic Beverage Ordinance adopted 
March 8, 1994 to read as follows: "The consumption of an alcoholic beverage or the 
possession of an open container, full or partially full, of an alcoholic beverage is 
prohibited on municipal property." (This shall replace the line, "The consumption of 
alcoholic beverages is prohibited on municipal property.") 

ARTICLE ^7. (by petition) 

To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Class V Highway a portion of a Class VI 
highway beginning at a point about 0.5 mile southerly from the Junction of the Lower 
Stonehouse Mt. Road and Rte. 25A to a brook and continuing southerly up that road 
about 1200 feet, provided that section of road is first brought up to Class V Highway 
standards by Nelson Kennedy. 



18 



ARTICLE 18. 

To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to apply for and receive Federal 
Disaster Assistance Funds through the State Disaster Coordination Office and to 
expend the funds so received to repair the damage done to town roads and/or bridges 
caused by any disaster for which federal funds are available. 

ARTICLE 19. (by petition) 

To see if the Town will vote to urge the New Hampshire Department of Transportation 
to continue its efforts to rehabilitate the historic Orford-Fairlee arched bridge at the 
earliest possible date, and to petition the New Hampshire Congressional delegation in 
Washington, D.C., to obtain sufficient federal demonstration project funds to expedite 
such rehabilitation work. 

ARTICLE 20. 

To hear the reports of Agents, Auditors and Committees heretofore chosen and to 
pass any vote relating thereto. 

ARTICLE 21. 

To transact any other business that may legally come before said meeting. 

Given under our hand and seal at Orford the 4th day of February in the year one 
thousand nine hundred and ninety-eight. 

David Bischoff 

Timothy Chase 

Paul J. Goundrey 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN, TOWN OF ORFORD 

A true copy: 

Attest: 

David Bischoff 

Timothy Chase 

Paul J. Goundrey 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN, TOWN OF ORFORD 



19 



1998 BUDGET OF THE TOWN OF ORFORD 









Actual 


Recommended 




Appropriations 


Expenditures 


Appropriations 


PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS 


1997 


1997 


1998 




Warrant 










Article 








Acct. No. 


GENERAL GOVERNMENT # 








4130-39 


Executive $ 


31,950. 


$ 31,813.43 


$ 32,660. 


4140-49 


Election, Registration, & 










Vital Statistics 


13,700. 


13,433.03 


15,325. 


4150-51 


Financial Adnninistration 


17,250. 


16,907.15 


17,550. 


4152 


Revaluation of Property 


800. 


568.64 


1,600. 


4153 


Legal Expense 


20,000. 


10,328.38 


8,000. 


4155-59 


Personnel Administration 


12,400. 


13,515.66 


20,820. 


4191-93 


Planning & Zoning 


5,510. 


5,710.89 


5,450. 


4194 


General Government Buildings 


7.050. 


5,339.72 


7,050. 


4195 


Cemeteries 


6,750. 


7,193.21 


7,900. 


4196 


Insurance 


12,000. 


11,858.00 


11,275. 


4197 


Advertising & 










Regional Associations 


937. 


937.00 


937. 


4199 


Other General Government 
PUBLIC SAFETY 


3,000. 


2,434.00 


3,000. 


4210-14 


Police 


35,105. 


35,134.41 


38,749. 


4215-19 


Ambulance 


14,112. 


14,112.00 


14,112. 


4220-29 


Fire 


17,700. 


17,712.14 


17,125. 


4290-98 


Emergency Management 
HIGHWAYS AND STREETS 


300. 


0.00 


300. 


4311-12 


Administration & 










Highways & Streets 


117,750. 


116,763.67 


120,422. 


4313 


Bridges 


6,000. 


5,402.48 


6,000. 


4316 


Street Lighting 
SANITATION 


4,300. 


4,373.17 


4,400. 


4321-23 


Administration & 










Solid Waste Collection 


4,940. 


4,680.00 


4,780. 


4324 


Solid Waste Disposal 
HEALTH 


30,000. 


31,177.79 


31,370. 


4411-14 


Administration & Pest Control 


1,400. 


938.14 


1,310. 


4415-19 


Health Agencies & Hospitals 










& Other 


5,225. 


5.250.00 


5,250. 



20 



1998 BUDGET OF THE TOWN OF ORFORD — 2 



PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS 



Appropriations 
1997 



Actual 

Expenditures 

1997 



Recommended 

Appropriations 

1998 



Acct. No. WELFARE 



Warrant 
Article 

# 



4441-42 Administration & 

Direct Assistance 
Intergovernmental 
Welfare Payments 

CULTURE AND RECREATION 



$ 



4444 



4,550. 
1,400. 



$ 1,588.65 
1,354.00 



$ 4,550. 
1,480. 



4520- 


-29 


Parks & Recreation 


12,360. 


13,374.36 


12,575. 


4550- 


-59 


Library 


12,720. 


13,536.50 


15,570. 


4583 




Patriotic Purposes 
CONSERVATION 


125. 


0.00 


125. 


4619 




Other Conservation 
DEBT SERVICE 


125. 


100.00 


125. 


4711 




Principal — Long Term 












Bonds & Notes 


10,000. 


10,000.00 


10,000. 


4721 




Interest — Long Term 












Bonds & Notes 


2,069. 


4,725.00 


4,725. 


4723 




Interest on TANs 
CAPITAL OUTLAY 


2,500. 


1,675.46 


2,500. 


4902 




Machinery, Vehicles 












& Equipment 


70,400. 


70,134.18 


1,500. 


4903 




Buildings 


1,500. 


0.00 


1,500. 


4909 




Improvements Other 












Than Buildings 


2,569. 


2,172.00 


2,401. 






OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT 








4915 


To Capital Reserve Fund 
DTAL1 


114,607. 


114,607.00 


56,000. 


SUBT( 


$603,104. 


$ 588,850.06 


$ 488,436. 



21 



1998 BUDGET OF THE TOWN OF ORFORD — 3 



PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS 


Appropriations 
1997 


Actual 

Expenditures 

1997 


Recommended 

Appropriations 

1998 


SPECIAL* WARRANT 
Acct. No. ARTICLES 

4909 Niles Fund 

4901 Brook Road Bridge 

4909 Paving 

4901 Creamery Road 


Warrant 
Article 

# 

13 $ 5,000. 

5 

8 20,000. 

9 


$ 609.00 
20,330.00 


$ 5,000. 

60,000. 

24,000. 

9,000. 


SUBTOTAL 2 Recommended 






$ 98,000. 



*Special warrant articles are defined in RSA 32:3, VI, as appropriations 1) in petitioned warrant 
articles; 2) appropriations raised by bonds or notes; 3) appropriating to a separate fund created 
pursuant to law, such as capital reserve funds or trusts funds; or 4) an appropriation designated 
on the warrant as a special article or as a nonlapsing or nontransferable article. 











Actual 


Recommended 






Appropriations 


Expenditures 


Appropriations 








1997 


1997 




1998 




Warrant 












INDIVIDUAL** WARRANT 


Article 










Acct. No. 


ARTICLES 


# 










4902 


Cruiser 


4 






$ 


30,000. 


4909 


Additional Personnel, etc. 


6 $ 


20,000. 


$ 12,055.71 




20,000. 


4901 


Prettyman Road 


7 








13,000. 


4909 


Computer & Software 


10 








6,900. 


4909 


Audit 


11 








4,000. 


4909 


PEP Studies 


12 








1,026. 


4909 


Hazardous Waste Disposal 
L3 Recommended 


13 








1,026 


SUBTOTA 








$ 


75,952. 



**"lndividual" warrant articles are not necessarily the same as "special warrant articles." An 
example of an individual warrant article might be negotiated cost items for labor agreements or 
items of a one time nature you wish to address individually. 



22 



1998 BUDGET OF THE TOWN OF ORFORD 







Estimated 


Actual 


Estimated 






Revenue 


Revenue 


Revenue 


SOURCE OF REVENUE 


1997 


1997 


1998 


Acct. No. 


TAXES 








3120 


Land Use Change Taxes 


$ 2,130. 


579.00 


$ 1,000. 


3185 


Yield Taxes 


10,250. 


8,266.82 


10,000. 


3186 


Payment in Lieu of Taxes 


900. 


904.00 


900. 


3190 


Interest & Penalties on 










Delinquent Taxes 


45,000. 


50,320.73 


50,000. 




LICENSES, PERMITS AND FEES 








3210 


Business Licenses & Permits 


200. 


0.00 


0. 


3220 


Motor Vehicle Permit Fees 


110,000. 


123,210.00 


123,000. 


3290 


Other Licenses, Permits & Fees 


2,200. 


2,832.86 


2,500. 


3311-19 


FROM FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 
FROM STATE 




1,528.00 




3351 


Shared Revenues 


9,541. 


39,417.02 


13,400. 


3352 


Meals & Rooms Tax Distribution 


11,110. 


11,121.59 


11,180. 


3353 


Highway Block Grant 
CHARGES FOR SERVICES 


44,855. 


44,854.85 


44,290. 


3401-06 


Income from Departments 


11,100. 


16,213.07 


12,000. 


3409 


Other Charges 
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 


3,750. 


4,896.00 


4,500. 


3501 


Sale of Municipal Property 


800. 


800.00 


20,000. 


3502 


Interest on Investments 


2,000. 


8,003.67 


8,000. 


3503-09 


Other 


4,000. 


15,850.76 


5,000. 




INTERFUND OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 






3915 


From Capital Reserve Funds 


113,607. 


95,000.00 


80,000. 


3916 


From Trust & Agency Funds 
VENUES & CREDITS 


5,000. 


209.00 


5,000. 


TOTAL RE 


$ 376,443. 


424,007.37 


$ 390,770. 


BUDGET SUMMARY 








SUBTOTAL 1 Recommended 






$ 488,436. 


SUBTOTAL 2 Special Warrant Articles Recommended 




98,000. 


SUBTOTAL 3 "Individual" Warrant Articles Recommended 




75,952. 


TOTAL Appropriations Recommended 






$ 662,388. 


Less: Amount of Estimated Revenues & Credits 




390,770. 


Estimated Amount of Taxes to be Raised 






$271,618. 



23 



BUDGET ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The Budget Advisory Committee lias worked with the selectmen during several 
rounds of budget request presentation meetings, other working meetings, and a 
formal budget meeting. No taxpayers other than committee members were present. 

The capital reserve fund deserves credit for helping to smooth out tax burden bumps. 

A new police cruiser is on the agenda for this year and this reserve reduces the 
amount we have to raise by taxes. 

Each department presented their proposals that were very compatible with last 
year's figures. 

The selectmen have worked with all departments to keep budgets in line. The work 
the selectmen did was admirable in keeping costs down. 

We now agree with the proposed budget for 1998. 

THE BUDGET ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



24 



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42 



STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATIONS 
Voted by the Town of ORFORD on March 11, 1997 

This is to certify that the information contained in this report was taken from 
official records and is correct to the best of our knowledge and belief. RSA 21-J:34. 

Selectmen of the Town of Orford April 25, 1997 



PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS 



Warr. Appropriations 
Art. # as Voted 



Account # 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



4130- 


-4139 


Executive 


3 


$ 30,100 


4140- 


-4149 


Election, Registration, & Vital Statistics 


3 


13,000 


4150- 


-4151 


Financial Administration 


3 


15,500 


4152 




Revaluation of Property 


3 


750 


4153 




Legal Expense 


3 


20,000 


4155- 


-4159 


Personnel Administration 


3 


23,000 


4191 - 


-4193 


Planning and Zoning 


3 


5,510 


4194 




General Government Buildings 


3 


7,000 


4195 




Cemeteries 


3 


6,750 


4196 




Insurance 


3 


12,000 


4197 




Advertising and Regional Associations 


3 


937 


4199 




Other General Government 
PUBLIC SAFETY 


3 


3,000 


4210- 


-4214 


Police 


3 


33,605 


4215- 


-4219 


Ambulance 


3 


14,112 


4220- 


-4229 


Fire 


3 


17,700 


4290- 


-4298 


Emergency Management 
HIGHWAYS AND STREETS 


3 


300 



4312 
4313 
4316 

4323 
4324 

4414 
4415 



4419 



4441 - 4442 
4444 



Highways and Streets 

Bridges 

Street Lighting 

SANITATION 

Solid Waste Collection 
Solid Waste Disposal 

HEALTH 

Pest Control 

Health Agencies and Hospitals and Other 

WELFARE 

Administration and Direct Assistance 
Intergovernmental Welfare Payments 



133,610 
6,000 
4,300 

4,940 
30,000 

1,350 
5,225 

4,550 
1,400 



43 



STATEMENT OF APPROPRIATION — 2 
Voted by the Town of ORFORD on March 11, 1997 



PURPOSE OF APPROPRIATIONS 



Warr. Appropriations 
Art. # as Voted 



Account # 

4520 - 4529 
4550 - 4559 
4583 



4619 

4711 
4721 
4723 



4901 
4902 
4903 
4909 



4915 
4916 



CULTURE AND RECREATION 

Parks and Recreation 

Library 

Patriotic Purposes 

CONSERVATION 

Other Conservation 

DEBT SERVICE 

Principal — Long Term Bonds & Notes 
Interest — Long Term Bonds & Notes 
Interest on Tax Anticipation Notes 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 

Land and Improvements 

Machinery, Vehicles and Equipment 

Buildings 

Improvements Other than Buildings 

OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT 

To Capital Reserve Fund 
To Expendable Trust Funds 
(except Health Maintenance Trust Fund) 



$ 



11,800 

12,720 

175 



125 



TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 



3 


10,000 


3 


2,069 


3 


2,500 


5 


20,000 


3&9 


70,400 


3 


1,500 


3 


2,569 


4 


114,607 


11 


5,000 




$648,104 



44 



STATEMENT OF REVISED ESTIMATED REVENUES 
For the Town of ORFORD — 1997 

Warr. For Use by 
SOURCE OF REVENUE Art. # Municipality 



Account # 


TAXES 




3120 


Land Use Change Taxes 


$ 2,130 


3185 


Yield Taxes 


10,250 


3186 


Payment in Lieu of Taxes 


900 


3190 


Interest & Penalties on Delinquent Taxes 
LICENSES, PERMITS AND FEES 


45,000 


3210 


Business Licenses and Permits 


200 


3220 


Motor Vehicle Permit Fees 


110,000 


3290 


Other Licenses, Permits and Fees 
FROM STATE 


2,200 


3351 


Shared Revenues 


9,541 


3352 


Meals and Rooms Tax Distribution 


11,110 


3353 


Highway Block Grant 
CHARGES FOR SERVICES 


44,855 


3401-3406 


Income from Departments 


11.100 


3409 


Other Charges 
MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 


3,750 


3501 


Sale of Municipal Property 


800 


3502 


Interest on Investments 


2,000 


3503- 3509 


Other 

INTERFUND OPERATING TRANSFERS IN 


4,000 



3915 From Capital Reserve Funds 7, 8 & 9 113,607 

3916 From Trust and Agency Funds 11 5,000 

SUBTOTAL OF REVENUES $ 376,443 

General Fund Balance 

Unreserved Fund Balance $ 65,851 

Fund Balance — Retained 30,000 

Fund Balance — Reduce Taxes 35,851 

TOTAL REVENUES AND CREDITS $412,294 

REQUESTED OVERLAY $ 20,000 

(RSA 76:6) 



45 



SUMMARY INVENTORY OF VALUATION 
Town of ORFORD in Grafton County 



This is to certify tinat the information contained in this report was taken from 
official records and is correct to the best of our knowledge and belief. RSA 21-J:34. 



Selectmen of the Town of Orford 






September 24, 1997 


CATEGORY 




— 


1997 
Assessed 
Valuation 


Totals 


VALUE OF LAND ONLY 




Current Use (At Current Use Values) 

Residential 

Commercial/Industrial 

Total of Taxable Land 

Tax Exempt & Non-Taxable 




$ 


1,462,140 

14,426,600 

31,900 

XXXXXX 


$ 15,920,640 


VALUE OF BUILDINGS ONLY 










Residential 

Manufactured Housing 
Commercial/Industrial 
Total of Taxable Buildings 
Tax Exempt & Non-Taxable 




$40,710,800 
937,000 
665,300 

XXXXXX 


$42,313,100 


PUBLIC UTILITIES — ELECTRIC 










Connecticut Valley Electric 
New England Power Co. 
New Hampshire ElectricCoop 
Central Vermont Electric 
Total of Electric Utilities 




$ 


389,032 

117,289 

817,467 

462 


$ 1,324,250 


VALUATION BEFORE EXEMPTIONS 








$ 59,557,990 


BLIND EXEMPTION 


(1) 


$ 


15,000 




ELDERLY EXEMPTION 


(8) 


$ 


95,000 




Elderly Exemptions GRANTED: 










3 (age 65 - 74) at $ 5,000 

2 (age 75 -79) at $10,000 

3 (age 80+) at $20,000 










TOTAL & PERMANENTLY DISABLED 
EXEMPTION 


(3) 
)MPU 


$ 
TEE 


15,000 




TOTAL DOLLAR AMOUNT OF EXEMPTIONS 


$ 125,000 


NET VALUATION ON WHICH TAX RATE IS CC 


$ 59,432,990 



46 



SUMMARY INVENTORY OF VALUATION - 
Town of ORFORD in Grafton County 



REVENUES RECEIVED FROM PAYMENTS IN LIEU OF TAXES MUNICIPALITY 



Other from MS-4, acct. 3186 



$ 900 



TAX CREDIT 

Totally and permanently disabled 
veterans, their spouses or widows, 
and the widows of veterans who 
died or were killed on active duty 

Other war service credits 

TOTAL NUMBER AND AMOUNT 



Limits 



Number 



$1,400 
$50 



2 

46 
48 



ESTIMATED 
TAX CREDITS 



$ 2,800 
2,300 



$5,100 



CURRENT USE REPORT 



CATEGORY 

Farm Land 
Forest Land 
Unproductive Land 

TOTAL 

OTHER CURRENT USE STATISTICS 
Receiving 20% Recreation Adjustment 
Removed from Current Use during current year 
# of Parcels in Current Use 



# OF ACRES 
RECEIVING 

CURRENT USE 
ASSESSMENT 

1,542.19 

21,698.62 

1,004.51 

24,245.32 

# OF ACRES 

12,811.59 
5.00 
323 



47 



1997 TAX RATE CALCULATION 
Town of ORFORD 



TAX RATES 



Appropriations 


648,104 




Less: Revenues 


412,294 




Less: Shared Revenues 


3,827 




Add: Overlay 


20,085 




War Service Credits 


5,100 




Net Town Appropriation 




257,168 


Special Adjustment 








Approved Town/City Tax Effort 
Municipal Tax Rate 

— SCHOOL PORTION — 

Due to Local School 1 ,487,667 

Due to Regional School 

Less: Shared Revenues 24,814 

Net School Appropriation 
Special Adjustment 

Approved School(s) Tax Effort 
School(s) Tax Rate 

— COUNTY PORTION — 



257,168 



4.33 



1 ,462,853 




1 ,462,853 



24.61 



Due to County 

Less: Shared Revenues 



80,866 
1,256 



Net County Appropriation 
Special Adjustment 

Approved County Tax Effort 
County Tax Rate 

COMBINED TAX RATE 

Total Property Taxes Assessed 

Less: War Service Credits 

Add: Village District Commitment(s) 

Total Property Tax Commitment 

— PROOF OF RATE — 



79,610 




Net Assessed Valuation 
59,432,990 



Tax Rate 
30.28 



79,610 



1,799,631 

(5,100) 


1,794,531 



Assessment 
1,799,631 



1.34 
30.28 



48 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 



DESCRIPTION 



ASSESSED VALUE 



Library. Land and Building 
Furniture and Equipment 



81,900 
10,100 



Police Department 

Furniture and Equipment 

Fire Department 
Equipment 

Highway Department, Land and Buildings 
Equipment 
Materials and Supplies 

Parks and Playgrounds, Land and Buildings 
Equipment 

Town Office, Land and Building 
Furniture and Equipment 

Schools, Land and Buildings 
Furniture and Equipment 



Cemeteries 




All Land and Buildings Acquired 


8-29-16 


1,500 


8-29-50 


2,000 


8-29-42 


1,500 


8-29-18 


1,500 


8-29-41 


2,000 


8-29-29 


2,000 


8-29-39 


2,000 


8-29-40 


2,000 


8-29-30 


2,000 


8-29-49 


2,000 


8-20-48 


2,000 


8-29-15 


1,500 


8-29-09 


2,000 


8-29-10 


2,000 


1-93-19 


4,300 


1-91-08 


18,800 



22,000 



342,000 

90,000 

240,000 

8,000 

154,800 
12,000 

157,000 
10,000 

1,808,000 
530,000 

23,600 



49,100 



TOTAL 



$3,538,500 



49 



STATEMENT OF BONDED DEBT 
TOWN OF ORFORD 

December 31, 1997 

Showing Annual Maturity of Outstanding Bond 



FIRE TRUCK BOND (1995) — 5.25% 

Maturities Original Amount: $98,000.00 

1998 10,000.00 

1999 10,000.00 

2000 10,000.00 

2001 10,000.00 

2002 10,000.00 

2003 10,000.00 

2004 10,000.00 

2005 10,000.00 

TOTAL $80,000.00 



50 



AUDITOR'S CERTIFICATE 

This is to certify that I have audited the various Town Officers' books for the fiscal year 
ending 12-31-97 as required by State law and have found them to be correct to the 
best of my knowledge and belief. 

The Trustee of the Funds' books were not available as of my certification date; 
consequently that portion of the audit is not included in this report. As soon as they 
are made available they will be reviewed and my report will be made to the Town of 
Orford and the State of New Hampshire. 

Joseph J. Arcolio 

TOWN OF ORFORD AUDITOR 



51 



TREASURER'S REPORT 

In Account with 

The Town of ORFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Cash on Hand January 1, 1997 

State of New Hampshire 

Louise Mack, Tax Collector 
1997 Property Tax 
1997 Yield Tax 
Previous Year's Property Tax 
Interest Collected and Costs 
Land Use Tax 

Deborah Williams-Matyka, Town Clerk 
Motor Vehicle Registration 
Boat Registration 
Dog Licenses 
Marriage Licenses 
Miscellaneous Income and Fees 

Other Receipts 

Tax Anticipation Note 
Interest Earned 
Federal Government 
Copier Receipts 
Income from Departments 
Trust Fund Income 
Miscellaneous Income 
Insurance Adjustments 
Trash Income 
Sale of Town Property 

Total Receipts 

Total Disbursements 

Cash on Hand December 31, 1997 





$ 449,718.31 




95,393.46 


$1,585,307.38 




8,266.82 




251,217.51 




50,320.73 




579.00 


1,895,691.44 


123,210.00 




728.36 




1,800.50 




304.00 




7,672.43 


133,715.29 


250,000.00 




8,003.67 




2,432.00 




258.99 




5,407.83 




95,209.00 




40.96 




15,850.76 




4,896.00 




800.00 


382,899.21 




$ 2,507,699.40 




$2,420,963.61 




$ 536,454.10 



52 



TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT 
Fiscal Year Ended December 31,1997 



1997 1996 Prior 



Uncollected Taxes — 
Beginning at Fiscal Year 

Property Taxes $236,91 9.67 

Yield Taxes 1,339.77 $1,417.05 

Bankruptcy 5,104.91 

Taxes Committed to Collector 

Property Taxes $ 1 ,801 ,81 7.00 

Yield Taxes 10,567.79 

Current Use 579.00 

Bankruptcy 6,716.00 

Refunded overpayment 

Property Tax 163.00 

Interest Collected on 

Delinquent Taxes 2,914.35 14,517.13 



TOTALS $1,816,041.14 $264,597.48 $1,417.05 



Remitted to Treasurer 
During Fiscal Year 

Property Taxes $ 1 ,583,008.90 $234,254.67 

Yield Taxes 1 0,022.78 1 ,339.77 

Interest on Delinquent Taxes 2,914.35 14,517.13 

Current Use 579.00 

Bankruptcy Payments 3,379.87 

Abatements Allowed $ 4,396.00 $ 1,762.00 

Funds in Bankruptcy $ 903.00 

Uncollected Taxes 
End of Fiscal Year 

Property Taxes 214,575.10 

Yield Taxes 545.01 1 ,41 7.05 

Bankruptcy 8,441 .04 



TOTALS $1,816,041.14 $264,597.48 $1,417.05 



53 



TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT — 2 

SUMMARY OF TAX LIEN ACCOUNTS 
Fiscal Year Ended December 31,1997 

1996 1995 1994 Prior 

Balance of Unredeemed Taxes 

Beginning of Fiscal Year 1/1/97 $83,913.60 $55,513.60 $5,758.30 

Mortgage Fees 1,477.00 894.00 23.00 

Taxes Executed to Town 

During Fiscal Year $130,527.92 

Mortgage Fees 1,791.00 

Interest Collected 

After Lien Execution 2,774.91 5,354.25 19,064.09 



TOTAL DEBITS 


$135,093.83 


$90,744.85 


$75,471.69 


$5,781.30 


Remitted to Treasurer 










During Fiscal Year 










Redemption 


$ 47,788.11 


$27,638.29 


$51,065.91 




^ Mortgage Fees 


325.00 


525.00 


828.00 




Interest and Cost after Lien 


2,774.91 


5,354.25 


19,064.09 




Abatements 










Funds in Bankruptcy 




$ 2,055.75 


$ 2,370.42 




Mortgage Fee Adjusted 




23.00 


23.00 




Deeded to Town 


$ 177.88 


631.89 


625.11 




Mortgage Fees 


10.00 


20.00 


33.00 




Unredeemed Taxes 


82,561.93 


53,587.67 


1,452.16 


5,758.30 


Mortgage Fees 


1,456.00 


909.00 


10.00 


23.00 


TOTAL CREDITS 


$135,093.83 


$ 90,744.85 


$75,471.69 


$5,781.30 



54 



TOWN CLERK'S ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE REPORT 
January 1, 1997 through December 31,1997 



TOTAL AMOUNT OF REVENUE 



$171,920.39 



Registrations 

1453 Auto Permits Issued 
1346 Municipal Agent Functions 



Town Tax Collected 






$123,210.00 


State Tax Collected 






$ 


38,205.10 


Town Clerk Fees 










1453 Registrations 
122 Title Applications 
114 Transfers 

1346 Municipal Agent 


@$1.00 
@$2.00 
@$5.00 
@$2.50 


$ 1,453.00 

244.00 

570.00 

3,365.00 


$ 


5,632.00 


Dump Tickets 






$ 


170.00 


Photocopies & Postage 






$ 


48.93 


Boat Registration Revenue 




$ 


728.36 


Dog Licenses 










321 Licenses Issued 
Late Penalties 
Town Clerk Fees 




$ 1,538.50 
262.00 
321.00 


$ 


2,121.50 


Marriage Licenses 










8 Marriage Licenses 
State Revenue 
Town Clerk Fees 


Issued 


$ 304.00 
56.00 


$ 


360.00 


Vital Record Copies 










37 Certified Copies Issued 
State Revenue 

33 Copies @ $6.00 
4 Copies @ $3.00 
Town Clerk Fees 

33 Copies @ $4.00 
4 Copies @ $3.00 


$ 198.00 
12.00 

132.00 
12.00 


$ 


354.00 


U.C.C. Filings 






$ 


884.00 


Miscellaneous Fees 






$ 


153.00 


Miscellaneous — Refund of Returned Check 


$ 


53.50 



55 



TOWN CLERK'S ACCOUNT 
January 1 — December 31,1997 



Boat Registrations 

54 Registrations Issued 
State Fees Collected 
Town Tax Collected 
Boat Agent Fees 

Total Boat Revenue 

OHRV Registrations 

30 Registrations Issued 
State Fees Collected 
OHRV Agent Fees 

Total OHRV Revenue 



$ 1,134.00 
728.36 
162.00 



$ 



958.00 
30.00 



N.H. Fish & Game Dept. — Licenses/Duck Stamps Sold 

31 Hunting/Fishing Licenses Issued 

State Fees Collected $ 

Agent Fees Collected 

Total N.H. Fish & Game Revenue 



747.25 
43.50 



Summary of Fees Paid to Town Clerk 

Auto Fees 
Boat Agent Fees 
Certified Copy Fees 
Dog License Fees 
Fish & Game Fees 
Marriage License Fees 
OHRV Agent Fees 
UCC Filing Fees 
Miscellaneous Fees 

Total Fees 



$ 5,632.00 

162.00 

144.00 

321.00 

43.50 

56.00 

30.00 

884.00 

153.00 

$ 7,425.50 



$2,024.36 



$ 988.00 



$ 790.75 



56 



DOG LICENSE FEES 

Male or Female $ 9.00 

Altered Animals 6.50 

Senior Citizens: for one animal 2.00 

thereafter, the regular fee 
(owner over 65 years of age) 

License fee for a puppy (older than 3 months but younger than 7 months) is $6.50 for 
the first initial year, (effective 01/01/97) 

GROUP LICENSES (effective 08/09/96) 

The minimum number of dogs required to qualify for a group license is five (5) 
dogs, and a standard fee of $20.00. 

Proof of rabies and altering is required. 

All dogs should be licensed by April 30, 1998 to avoid any penalty. 

The Town Clerk's Office will be receiving the triplicate copy of the rabies vaccination 
for dogs and cats directly from New Hampshire veterinarians for the dogs or cats 
whose owners reside in Orford. If your dog is not licensed with the Town of Orford by 
May 31, 1998, we will be obligated to inform the Orford Animal Control Officer of a 
violation of RSA 466:1 . A civil forfeiture will be issued which carries with it a $25.00 fine 
plus late fees. 

RABIES CLINIC 

A "Rabies Clinic" has been scheduled to be held on Monday, April 20, 1998, 
between 6:30 and 7:30 p.m. at the Orford Fire Station. This has been arranged with 
the Oxbow Veterinary Clinic of Bradford, Vermont, the Orford Town Clerk, and Orford 
Fire Department. Attendance at this program is not only convenient, but offers these 
shots at a reduced rate. 

Dog Rabies $ 7.00 

Dogs EPI Vaccine (distemper, etc.) 12.00 

Cat Rabies and Distemper 12.00 

Cat Leukemia 12.00 

If people see an animal they suspect of being rabid, contact Roy Daisey, Orford 

Animal Control Officer, Orford Police Department or the N.H. Fish and Game 

Department. 

RSA 436:99, ll-VI requires that all dogs and cats have rabies shots once they reach the age of 
3 months. This became effective on January 1, 1993. The first rabies shot will be good for only one 
year, on a young dog or cat, but a three-year vaccine will be given thereafter. 

Rabies is a viral disease which attacks the central nervous system in mammals including wild 
animals, pets and humans. If untreated, it is almost always fatal. 

Rabies is spread from a bite or contact with the saliva of an infected animal. An indication 
that an animal has rabies is a noted change in its behavior, such as loss of the normal fear of humans 
or a display of hostile actions. Rabies is impossible to diagnose without a medical test that can only 
be done after the infected mammal is dead. 

Rabies is preventable. Dogs, cats, horses and other domestic animals can be vaccinated against 
the disease. If the vaccinated pet comes into contact with an infected animal, the disease will not 
spread. However, humans that come into contact with the saliva from a rabid animal on their 
pet can get the disease. If exposed to saliva from any animal which may be suspected of carrying 
rabies, the wound or infected area should be soaked for 10 minutes in soap and water prior to going 
to the emergency room of a hospital. 



57 



SELECTMEN 

The town-wide reappraisal was completed for the 1997 tax billing. The Selectmen did 
not simply accept the new values. We reviewed and then discussed with appraising 
personnel concerns we had with values of particular categories, areas of town and 
certain parcels. Taxpayers are welcome to contact us if they have questions about 
their new valuations. 

Except for final map approval and addressing, 911 is operational. The Selectmen 
understand and share the frustration of townspeople with the delay. The following is 
an indication of why it is taking so long. In June we received maps showing driveway 
locations on all roads in Orford. On two consecutive Mondays, the Selectmen drove 
the roads to verify the locations of the driveways. We found some inaccuracies and 
sent the maps back to Concord before the end of June. In November, four months 
later and after several phone calls, the mapping personnel finally returned to Orford to 
do the remapping. To date, we still have not received the new maps. 

In 1997, the Board of Selectmen, in conjunction with the Road Agent, decided to 
spend the Town's paving budget on sealing those town roads that would benefit from 
this preventive maintenance practice. This should help maintain the present condition 
of these paved roads and slow their deterioration. During 1997 Road Agent Jim Fields 
gathered information on different methods for repairing 1 .3 miles of Archertown Road. 
These prices ranged from $42,000 to $93,000. It was decided that the best option 
would be to repair this 1 .3 miles with a shim and overlay of cold mix over the next two 
years at a cost of $24,000 each year. Article 8 requests the funds necessary for this 
year's work. 

Brook Road bridge over Jacob's Brook is on the State's red list of critical bridges. 
Article 5 addresses this problem. We have been working with engineer Tim Ruggles 
on a plan for replacing this bridge. We are asking the voters to raise and appropriate 
$60,000 for this project. As the article states, we will be using capital reserve funds to 
accomplish this replacement. 

There are two other road projects that must be done this year. Article 7 asks for 
$13,000 to make repairs on Prettyman Road. Presently, this road floods on a regular 
basis making travel hazardous and, at times, impossible. The plans call for increasing 
the size of the two existing culverts to 48" and raising the roadbed two feet. The 
passage of Article 9 will allow us to stabilize the bank along Jacob's Brook which is 
collapsing and threatening Creamery Road. In order to stop the erosion, rip-rap would 
be placed at the bottom of the bank and cribbing filled with rocks and soil would be 
placed above the flow line. This would allow for revegetation which would further 
stabilize the bank. Bendway weirs would be placed in the streambed to divert flow 
away from the bank to prevent future erosion. 

The Police Department cruiser is due for replacement in 1998. The Board of 
Selectmen recommends Article 4 which would authorize us to withdraw the necessary 
funds from the police cruiser capital reserve fund and trade in the present cruiser to 
fund the purchase and equipping of the new cruiser. 



58 



The passage of the 1998 budget and all money articles in the 1998 warrant would 
require a projected $271,618 to be raised by taxes. This compares to $271,661 which 
was needed in 1997. The Town's ability to accomplish the projects described above 
and not increase the tax rate reflects well on the people that work for the town, both 
paid and volunteer. 

In the coming years, we anticipate some major expenditures. The Fire Department will 
need a new rescue/equipment truck that could cost $100,000 or more (at this time 
there is approximately $66,000 in the fire truck capital reserve fund); a new highway 
department truck will be needed at a cost of approximately $70,000 and bridges will 
need to be replaced or repaired. To accomplish this without increasing the tax rate will 
continue to be a challenge. 

We would like to note with appreciation Jim Field's two years of service to the Town 
as road agent. To all those individuals whose terms expire this year, our sincere thank 
you. We would also like to encourage everyone to get involved in town affairs. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
David Bischoff 
Timothy Chase 
Paul Goundrey 



SPECIAL THANKS 

We would like to thank fellow selectman Tim Chase for the time and effort he has 
given in the past three years. 



59 



ORFORD CEMETERY COMMISSION 

The Cemetery Commissioners report with regret the retirement of Fay Bean as 
groundskeeper of the Orford cemeteries. Fay has been a most faithful and caring 
person and has given many years of service. His knowledge of our cemeteries and 
his help to all who visit our cemeteries from near and far away places will be greatly 
missed. We all thank you, Fay, for your dedication in this, a "job well done." 

The maintenance work for 1997 has been ably done by Kurt Gendron with Shirley 
Gendron assisting. As in past years, the Dame Hill Cemetery is maintained by Fred 
and Judy Siemens. 

We applaud the fine work done in all our cemeteries. We wish our workers and the 
town to know how often we receive compliments on the care of our cemeteries and 
the courteous help given when people come to visit. 

We are well aware of the condition of our fencing and expect to start working on the 
problems in 1998. Extensive and unexpected tree work done in the East (Davis) 
Cemetery took time and stressed our 1997 budget. 

Respectfully submitted, 
COMMISSIONERS 
Paul B. Messer, Sr. 
Ruth L. Brown 
Julia M. Fifield 

FINANCIAL REPORT 
Year Ending December 31, 1997 

Cash on Hand January 1 , 1 997 $ 831 .77 

Receipts 

Town of Orford $ 5,000.00 
Trustees of Trust Funds 6,500.00 

Donations (stone repair) 1 ,000.00 

Miscellaneous 135.00 $12,635.00 

Disbursements 

Wages and Federal Taxes 

Gas and Oil 

Repairs 

Supplies 

Restoration and Cleaning 

Miscellaneous 

Cash on Hand December 31, 1997 





$13,466.77 


$ 8,592.98 




222.42 




633.59 




139.05 




1,200.00 




2,109.50 


$12,897.54 




$ 569.23 




$13,466.77 



60 



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

Our accomplishments in 1997 were; 

1 . An emergency plan was created for Orford School. This was started 
with Dr. Berliner and work continues with the help of our new principal, 
Sheila Moran, and Bob Thatcher. 

2. With the help of Greg Champlain of the New Hampshire Office of 
Emergency Management, we are trying to get a generator for the 
school. The Orford School is designated as the community's emergency 
shelter and a generator is needed to run the necessary systems. 

3. We hope to purchase a generator for the Town Office. The Town 
Office is designated as the communications/emergency management 
headquarters for the town. 

There will be free training on procedures for handling different types of disasters for 
anyone who would like to volunteer their services. You may contact Rita Pease at 
353-9070 or the school at 353-4321 and talk with Sheila Moran or Bob Thatcher. 
Anyone interested in having a fundraiser to help with these programs, please call me 
at 353-9070. 

Rita Pease 

Emergency Management Director 



61 



ORFORD VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT 

In 1997 the Orford Volunteer Fire Department responded to 32 calls. 

Mutual Aid 6 Power Lines 4 

Fire Alarms 4 Ambulance Assists 5 

Car Accidents 7 Woods Rescue 1 

Illegal Burns 5 

In 1999 the Fire Department will be asking to replace equipment truck #5 at a 
projected cost of $135,000. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Arthur Dennis 
FIRE CHIEF 



62 



TOWN FOREST FIRE WARDEN 
AND STATE FOREST RANGER 

To aid your Forest Fire Warden, Fire Department and State Forest Ranger, contact 
your local Warden or Fire Department to find out if a permit is required. Violations of 
RSA227-L:17, the fire permit law and the other burning laws of the State of New 
Hampshire are misdemeanors punishable by fines of up to $2,000 and/or a year in jail. 
Violators are also liable for all fire suppression costs. 

There are ten Forest Rangers who work for the New Hampshire Division of Forests 
and Lands, Forest Protection Bureau. State Forest Rangers are available to assist 
communities with forest fire suppression, prevention and training programs as well as 
the enforcement of forest fire and timber harvest laws. If you have any questions 
regarding forest fire or timber harvest laws please call our office at 271-2217. 

There are 2400 Forest Fire Wardens and Deputy Forest Fire Wardens throughout the 
state. Each town has a Forest Fire Warden and several Deputy Wardens who assist 
the Forest Rangers with forest fire suppression, prevention, and law enforcement. The 
1997 fire season was a safe period for wildland firefighters with no major injuries 
reported. The drought conditions experienced during the early summer months were 
a significant factor resulting in the total number of fires reported during the season. 

The State of New Hampshire operates 15 fire towers, 2 mobile patrols and 3 contract 
aircraft patrols. This early detection and reports from citizens aid in the quick response 
from local fire departments. This is a critical factor in controlling the size of wildland 
fires and keeping the loss of property and suppression costs as low as possible. 

1997 Fire Statistics 

(All Fires Reported through December 23, 1997) 



FIRES REPORTED BY COUNTY 



CAUSES OF FIRES REPORTED 



Belknap 


58 


Smoking 


54 


Carroll 


96 


Debris Burning 


261 


Cheshire 


63 


Campfire 


99 


Coos 


29 


Power Line 


33 


Grafton 


51 


Railroad 


3 


Hillsborough 


145 


Equipment Use 


23 


Merrimack 


148 


Lightning 


14 


Rockingham 


54 


Children 


60 


Strafford 


63 


OHRV 





Sullivan 


19 


Miscellaneous 


130 






Incendiary 


33 


TOTAL FIRES 


726 


Fireworks 


16 


TOTAL ACRES 


177.17 






Stephen Kessler 






Gerald Pease 


Forest Ranger 






Forest Fire Warden 



63 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Dear Orford Residents, 

We started out the year with a lot of late snow and then we had a lot of mud in the 
spring — which is one of the "JOYS" of living on the back roads. 

The new truck with the front-mounted sander and two-way plow works very well. We 
purchased a used wood chipper from the New Hampshire Surplus Department which 
is doing a good job. 

We removed the old wooden bridge and installed a 12' x 8' x 40' pipe arch on Town 
Road #100. We sealed five miles of tar road which will help save some roads. 
Archertown Road should be 1998's big project. 

Two points that need to be addressed are: 

1. It is getting harder and harder to find good QUALIFIED part-time help with a CDL 
when YOU need them! 

2. It is time that the school's plowing and driveway and parking lot maintenance work 
come out of the school's budget NOT the highway budget. 

James E. Fields 
Road Agent 






64 



ORFORD FREE LIBRARY 

The Orford Free Library had an active year in 1997. The library hours expanded to 
13V2 per week with the addition of Saturday morning hours. A new sign with the open 
times is in place outside the library. The attendance by patrons and circulation of 
materials have both increased. The computer was available to the public and was 
used to access the Internet for 40 hours. Through the computer, 55 Interlibrary Loans 
were made. Additionally, the meeting room was used twelve times this year by 
committees and tutor/student pairs. 

The library presented a variety of programs for adults and children. Topics for these 
included: perennial gardening, home schooling, orienteering, wildflowers, living with 
wildlife, languages, a teddy bear picnic, story hours and the Summer Reading 
Program. In many of these programs, townspeople were the leaders and were able to 
share their knowledge with other community members. These programs have proved 
very popular and will continue in the coming year. 

In addition to providing books and magazines, computer access and programs, the 
library also has audio and video tapes which are provided through the LUV Coop. 
Music tapes are available thanks to a donation. A collection of materials of special 
interest to home schoolers, educators and parents is now available. The library also 
has materials pertaining to town organizations and of community interest. 

Increased cooperation between the libraries was a goal for 1997 and continues into 
1998. Books may be dropped off at the Free Library for return to the Social Library. 
In May, the Trustees from both libraries met at the Free Library to discuss common 
concerns and fundraising. As in the past, the Summer Reading Program was 
presented jointly. 

The Free Library is very appreciative of the donations of time, materials, money and 
baked goods it has received. Volunteer hours at the library were many — 331 hours in 
all. Special thank yous go to Barbara Hall, Florence Wyman, Hannah Marsh, Sarah Hook, 
Sarah Roberts, Nancy Grandine and Marion Jacobus for their generous donations of time. 

In the upcoming year, several new features are planned for the library. The long awaited 
stove will be installed in the historical collection room making this area available for 
quiet study or meetings. The purchase of a copier for public use is expected by tax 
time. Finally, in response to requests for a larger selection of current fiction and 
nonfiction books, the library will begin participation in the McNaughton Lease 
Program. We welcome you all to see our growing and active library. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Board of Trustees: Librarian: 

Carol Boynton Roberta Roberts 

Susan Kling 

Juli Washburn 



65 



ORFORD FREE LIBRARY — 2 
LIBRARY STATISTICS 



Total Attendance: 

Total Items Circulated: 

Library Open: 

Volunteer Hours: 

Books and Magazines Donated: 



1,304 
1,969 

169 days (679 hours) 

331 

120 



FINANCIAL REPORT 1997 



Receipts 



Cash on hand January 1, 1997 


$ 


4,164.15 


Town of Orford 




6,650.00 


Friends of the Orford Libraries Gift 




236.80 


Book/Bake Sale 




114.50 


Interest 




83.00 


Computer Services 




4.00 


Gift 




100.00 




$11,352.45 


Expenditures 






Books 


$ 


987.59 


Multimedia 




286.58 


Magazines 




135.85 


Librarian 




2,659.68 


FICA/SS 




440.64 


Dues/Memberships 




230.00 


Fuel/Heat 




1,000.42 


Maintenance 




152.45 


Postal 




33.00 


Telephone 




443.00 


Computer Services 




84.65 


Supplies 




52.99 


Grounds 




68.00 




$" 


6,574.85 


Balance in checking account December 31, 1997 


$ 


4,777.60 




$11,352.45 



66 



ORFORD SOCIAL LIBRARY 

The Trustees of the Orford Social Library are pleased to report a most productive year. 

Our new larger and more efficient computer went on line in the spring. It provides word 
processing. CD Rom capabilities, and internet access. We encourage the public to 
take advantage of this wonderful resource. 

We wish to thank the Orford School for their donation of the proceeds from their 
Winter Workshop towards the purchase of the computer; Joe Arcolio for designing and 
constructing a special computer table; and the Connecticut River Network for providing 
free access to the internet. 

Our library has responded to increased demand by expanding our hours on Mondays 
from 4:00 to 8:00 p.m., thereby bringing the number of hours of library access to 1 5 hours 
a week. We have joined the Video and Audio Cooperative Rotating Collections of 
the Upper Valley, providing our users with an increased supply of worthwhile audio/ 
visual material. 

Another addition to our schedule is a well-attended story hour for preschool youngsters 
which is held on the 2nd and 4th Wednesday of the month. The Orford Elementary 
School children continue to visit and take out books on a regular basis. We are also 
aware of more older students using our resource materials. 

We are most grateful for our regular volunteers including Pat O'Bryan, Florence Wyman, 
Rika Schmidt, Jean Dyke, Joe Davis, Ruth Brown and newcomers Marie Hemenway 
and Gary Dimick. They have given a total of 325 hours. To these names we add many 
other loyal people who give many unrecorded hours in various capacities. 

This year we had 5,081 people use the library. Our total circulation was 6,761 and we 
purchased 289 additional items. 

We acknowledge with appreciation the many donations of books, magazines and 
other materials. 

Sarah Putnam, our librarian, devotes many long hours above and beyond the call of 
duty assisting our patrons and providing a most welcoming atmosphere in an efficient 
library. The Trustees extend our special thanks and appreciation to Sarah. 

Orford Social Library Trustees, 

Ruth L. Brown Julia M. Fifield, Chairman 

Judith H. Cross Ellen R. Gluek 

Ann G. Davis, Secretary Jude Parker 

Jean W. Dyke Julie A. Peters, Treasurer 



67 



ORFORD SOCIAL LIBRARY — 2 
FINANCIAL REPORT 1997 



Cash on Hand January 1, 1997 



$ 1,027.05 



Income 

Town of Orford 

New Gifts 

Interest and Dividends 

Money Market 

Book Sales 

Education 

Miscellaneous 

Disbursements 

Book Purchases 

Lights 

Heat and Water 

Supplies 

Telephones 

Maintenance 

Miscellaneous 

Librarian 

Education 

Cleaning 

Grounds 

Furniture 

Historical 

Payroll Tax 

Cash on Hand December 31, 1997 



$ 



5,000.00 
267.00 

6,679.21 

11,751.43 

203.25 

533.44 

945.43 



$25,379.76 





$26,406.81 


$ 5,136.79 




799.84 




1 ,398.22 




461.05 




1,175.54 




1 ,074.50 




326.93 




9,350.00 




849.54 




220.00 




956.17 




933.99 




431 .80 




827.04 


$23,941.41 




$ 2,465.40 




$26,406.81 



68 



NILES COMMITTEE 

The Niles Committee was formed in 1988 to dispense by request the interest on a gift 
of $50,000.00 to the Town of Orford by Mrs. Lenore Niles. Both Mr. and Mrs. Niles, 
who moved to Orford in 1950, had a deep affection for our town and its people. Mrs. 
Niles passed away in 1988, and left us a generous and unrestricted gift to be used for 
the betterment of Orford and its residents. 

The Niles Committee did not receive any applications or dispense any funds in 1997. 
The Committee will meet in January and May in 1998 to act on any applications 
received at those times. 

Applications to the Niles Committee for funds for community-wide efforts, service 
projects and programs are kept at the Town Office and may be picked up during 
regular office hours. Applications are encouraged and may be received at any time 
during the year, and are to be addressed as stated on the form. 



69 



ORFORD PLANNING BOARD 

Major actions taken were: 

Approved two (2) applications for minor lot line adjustments no new lots 

Approved one (1) application for voluntary merger of lots minus 1 lot 

Approved three (3) applications for minor subdivisions 3 new lots 

Held five (5) informal discussions before application 
Approved one (1) gravel pit extension 

Total new building lots 2 

Other actions taken: 

Completed and approved a thorough revision of the Orford Subdivision 
Regulations. The new regulations became effective September 1, 1997. 

Approved a revised and expanded Driveway Permit procedure. 

Initiated exploration of a special permitting procedure applicable to the situation 
of 2-dwelling units on one lot which is a non-conforming use under the existing 
regulations. We would appreciate public comment. 

Granted final approval of the Stonehouse Mountain major subdivision upon 
confirmation by the Town's contract engineer that the access road was completed in 
conformance with the Board's specifications and all requirements of the original 
Conditional Approval were completed. 

Submitted letters of support for the expedited renovation of the Orford-Fairlee 
bridge and the proposed Connecticut River Scenic Byway program. 

Hosted a presentation of the final report of the Upper Valley Regional Sub- 
Committee of the Connecticut River Joint Commissions explaining the newly published 
Connecticut River Management Plan. The Board subsequently adopted the Plan 
recommendations by reference as a planning document until they can be incorporated 
into the Master Plan. It was noted that while Orford's ponds and lakes are protected 
by the New Hampshire Comprehensive Shoreline Protection Act, the Connecticut 
River is not. As a vital asset and part of the Town, its future is a paramount concern of 
the Board. 

Planning Board officers were elected at the March 1997 meeting: 

Chairman Paul Dalton 

Vice-Chairman Elizabeth Bischoff 

Secretary Andrew Schwaegler 

Selectmen's Rep. David Bischoff 
Guy Hebb was appointed a Board Alternate. We seek two more citizens willing to serve. 

The Board continues to contract with an UVLSRPC Planning Assistant, Shelly Hadfield, 
to be at the Town Offices one Friday per month from 3:00-5:00 p.m. (dates posted at 
Town Hall) to help applicants with questions and procedures. She is also available for 
appointments by calling the Upper Valley Lake Sunapee Regional Planning 
Commission in Lebanon, 603-448-1680. We urge everyone to avail themselves of the 
"informal discussion" process to simplify applications, keep costs to a minimum and 
understand the issues before they become problems. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Paul Dalton 
Chairman 



70 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

1997 has been a busy year for your Police Department. As reflected by the statistics 
contained in this report, it is clear that Orford is not immune from crime. However, I am 
glad to report that the Town had its lowest burglary rate in seven years, with two-thirds 
of those burglaries solved. The Police Department also had a 98% Court Conviction 
rate in 1997, with three felony indictments in Superior Court. 

I attribute the above statistics to the initiation of pro-active patrol procedures and 
cooperation from the citizens of Orford in reporting suspicious activity to the Police. 

As you will note, there is an increase in the Police Department budget. A large portion 
of this increase is due to the increase in dispatch services provided by the Town of 
Hanover. Also the cost of Police Medicare, and Retirement is now being taken 
from the Police budget. This expense was previously paid from the Personnel 
Administrative Account. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Officer John Richardson for his contribu- 
tion to the Orford Police Department. John has donated over 500 hours of his time to 
your Town's Police Department. John is a certified Part-Time Officer and has com- 
pleted the advanced Part-Time Officers School. 

Your Department also presented the DARE program to the sixth grade class and a 
Halloween Safety program to grades K-5. 

I would like to take this opportunity to thank the residents of Orford for their continued 
support and involvement. The Police Department cannot accomplish the mission with 
which it is charged unless the community it serves supports the Department and 
involves itself with the problems we face. 

The essential purpose of the Orford Police Department is to protect life, property and 
the right of all persons within its jurisdiction to be free from criminal attack, to be 
secure in their possessions and to live in peace. The Department seeks to serve the 
people of Orford, New Hampshire by performing these functions in a professional 
manner, and is ultimately responsible to the people for their proper performance. 

Respectfully, 
Michael LaChapelle 
Chief of Police 



71 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 
STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR OF 1997 



Accidents 24 

Aid Persons 49 

Aid Otiier Dept 72 

Alarms 24 

Animals 75 

Arson 00 

Assaults 02 

Auto Theft 01 

Ambulance Calls 07 

Bad Checks 07 

Burglary 03 

Civil Problems 15 

Criminal Homicide 00 

Criminal Mischief 22 

Criminal Threatening 00 

Disorderly Conduct 13 

Domestic 14 

Drug Offense 01 

Fire Calls 08 

Harassing Phone Calls 05 

Juvenile Laws 05 



Larceny 03 

Liquor Laws 00 

Littering .03 

Lost & Found Property 08 

Mental Persons 00 

Miscellaneous 32 

Missing Persons 01 

M/V Complains 29 

M/V Summons 86 

M/V Warnings 198 

OHRV Complaints 01 

Pistol Permits 07 

Possible Stolen Property .... 00 

Property Checks 35 

Sex Offenses 00 

Suicide Attempts 01 

Suspicion 32 

Town Ordinances 00 

Unattended Death 01 

Wanted Persons 04 

Weapons 03 



Total Calls for Service in 1997 . 



791 



72 



SKI PROGRAM 

The program offers beginner, intermediate and advanced instruction in alpine skiing 
on eight consecutive Wednesday afternoons from the beginning of January to early 
March at the Dartmouth S(<iway. Bus transportation is provided to and from the Skiway. 
The program is open to all school-age residents of Orford and to all students in the 
Orford Schools. A nominal fee is charged, supplement funding is received from 
the Parks and Recreation Commission and the volunteer instructors run fundraisers 
during the off-season to insure financial soundness. 

The 1997 season was very successful aided by heavy early season snow. We did 
have to cancel one week during the January thaw due to rain which extended the 
season one more week in March. As has become traditional, the last week was a 
"Carnival" with races, games and refreshment for all participants. 

A total of 73 children participated again this year, about a third of the entire school 
enrollment. We had one Kindergartner and nine first-grader beginners, 51 children in 
grades 2-8 and 12 high school students. 

We had 18 instructors volunteer their time and talents, 11 in the beginner group and 
7 for more advanced skiers. Four additional substitutes proved invaluable as schedule 
conflicts and illness absences are inevitable over an 8-week period. Thank you all 
for volunteering and once again providing an unequaled opportunity for 70-plus 
youngsters to learn and enjoy the lifelong sport of alpine skiing. A special thanks to the 
non-skiing volunteers, JoAnn Morris and Juli Washburn, who rode the bus, handed 
out schedule assignments, maintained head counts and kept a modicum of peace and 
tranquillity in the Lodge. 

SKI PROGRAM COORDINATORS 
Paul Dalton 
Esther Marsh 



73 



SWIM PROGRAM 

The summer swim program got off to a good start with a day-long clean-up project at 
Indian Pond. Brush that obstructed the parents' view of their young swimmers was cut 
back, new docks were put into the water, and sand was dumped to add to the beach. 
There were about fifteen individuals who helped. There isn't room to include all the 
names, but thanks for the effort! 

Sixty children participated in the Swim Program in the summer of '97. We had our 
usual summer with a few days seeming more like April than July, but in spite of cool 
water, leeches, and stormy days, most continue to enjoy the lessons with a spirit of 
adventure. In addition to our usual swim instruction, we were able to graduate four 
swimmers in the Red Cross certified "Water Safety Aide" program. They were 
Josh Titus, Jennifer and Sarah Hook, and Anna Knapp. It is our hope that they will be 
available as aides, and then possibly become instructors, when they reach the age of 
sixteen and can take further Red Cross courses. 

For the coming summer we will be in need of a new instructor and some new 
members for the swim committee. Again, it would be ideal to find a local person who 
would be willing to be available for several years as instructor. Parents of younger 
children make great members of the committee for continuity. Please contact 
Peggy Villar at 353-4552 if you or someone you know would be willing to serve. 

Peggy Villar 
Brenda Hook 
Cara Dyke 
Marcia Knapp 



74 



CONNECTICUT RIVER JOINT COMMISSIONS 
UPPER VALLEY RIVER SUBCOMMITTEE 

In 1997, the Upper Valley River Subcommittee completed its work on the Connecticut 
River Corridor Management Plan. The Plan, a product of the local representatives 
serving on the Subcommittee from riverfront towns in New Hampshire and Vermont, 
recognizes the Connecticut River as an invaluable resource and provides a coordinated 
approach for local residents and municipalities to practice good stewardship of the 
river in the future. 

Containing recommendations regarding water quality, recreation, fisheries, habitat 
and wildlife, agriculture, bank erosion, and future land use, the Management Plan is 
intended as a guide for use by local towns, public agencies, private organizations, and 
landowners and other individuals. 

In July, copies of the Management Plan were provided to members of the Orford 
Board of Selectmen, Planning Board, Conservation Commission, and Parks and 
Playgrounds Committee, as well as to the libraries and the school. In August, Orford's 
Subcommittee representatives met with the Planning Board to review the Plan's 
contents and findings, and to recommend that specific steps be taken to protect and 
conserve the shoreline and areas adjacent to it along the Connecticut River in Orford. 
On November 17, following a public hearing, the Planning Board took the first step in 
this regard by adopting the Connecticut River Corridor Management Plan as a reference 
document for the Town of Orford's Master Plan. Since then, the Planning Board has 
given active consideration to the Subcommittee representatives' recommendation that 
the Town of Orford adopt specific measures to provide protection for the Connecticut 
River shoreline. 

The Upper Valley River Subcommittee, formed in January 1 993, under the N.H. Rivers 
Management and Protection Act, includes citizens nominated by the selectmen of 
towns on both sides of the Connecticut River, from Bradford to Hartford, VT, and from 
Piermont to Lebanon, NH. It continues to meet and advise the states of Vermont and 
New Hampshire, the federal government, and the Connecticut River Joint Commissions 
on local matters affecting the river, such as bank stabilization, boating access, and 
permit applications for river-related projects. The Subcommittee is advisory and has no 
regulatory powers. All meetings are open to the public and take place on the second 
Monday of the month from 7-9 p.m. at the Lyme Town Office. Local residents are 
encouraged to attend and contribute their ideas. If you are interested in serving as a 
member of the Subcommittee, please contact the Board of Selectmen. 

Carl Schmidt 
Pat Tullar 



75 



GRAFTON COUNTY SENIOR CITIZENS COUNCIL, INC. 

Grafton County Senior Citizens Council, Inc. works through its local programs to 
support the health and well-being of our older citizens and to assist them to remain 
independent in their own homes and communities for as long as possible. Through 
eight locations throughout the County, including Plymouth, Bristol, Canaan, Lebanon, 
Orford, Haverhill, Littleton and Lincoln, older adults and their families are able to 
obtain community-based long-term care services such as home delivered meals, 
senior dining room programs, transportation, social work services, information and 
referral, health and educational programs, adult day care, recreation and opportunities 
to be of service to the community through volunteering. 

During 1997, 59 older residents of Orford were able to make use of one or more of 
GCSCC's services, offered through the Orford Area Senior Services. These individuals 
enjoyed 763 balanced meals in the company of friends in a senior dining room, 
received 1,146 hot, nourishing meals delivered to their homes by caring volunteers, 
were transported to health care providers or other community resources on 153 occasions 
by our lift-equipped buses, were helped through 2 visits by a trained social worker and 
found opportunities to put their talents and skills to work for a better community 
through 691 hours of volunteer service. The cost to provide these services for Orford 
residents in 1 997 was $1 0,452. 1 3. 

Community based services provided by GCSCC and its many volunteers for older 
residents of Orford were often important to their efforts to remain in their own homes 
and out of institutional care despite chronic health problems and increasing physical 
frailty, saving tax dollars and contributing to the quality of life of our older friends 
and neighbors. 

GCSCC very much appreciates the support of the Orford community for services 
which enhance the independence and dignity of our older citizens and assists them to 
meet the challenges of aging in place. 

Carol W. Dustin 
Executive Director 



Orford Area Senior Services 
P.O. Box 98, Orford, NH 03777 
Gail Dimick, Coordinator 
353-9107 



76 



UPPER VALLEY AMBULANCE 

Upper Valley Ambulance, Inc. has continued to grow to meet the complex challenge 
of providing emergency transport ambulance service to the eight-town region. UVA 
has had another very busy year in 1997. We responded to approximately 650 
requests for medical assistance. Of those 650 requests, care was delivered without 
transporting the patient about 25% of the time. UVA does not charge in those 
instances. Our efforts to keep costs down for the townspeople by diversifying operations 
have been successful. The per capita charge to the eight towns will remain $14.00 for 
the upcoming year. As a point of reference, $1.00 per capita equals roughly $10,000. 
We are continuing with the policy of not requiring the eight member towns to guarantee 
payment for unpaid ambulance bills. Also, when Upper Valley Ambulance started in 
1990 the per capita cost was $14.00. Of the $14.00, $1.15 goes directly to Hanover 
for dispatch services. We recently received notice that there will likely be a significant 
increase in those dispatch service fees. 

The Board of Directors of Upper Valley Ambulance has reviewed the budgetary needs 
for the upcoming year. Medicare/Medicaid reimbursement rates do not cover the cost 
of providing service and UVA expects to write off over $100,000 in those charges. We 
expect to turn over an additional $50,000 in unpaid bills to our collection agency. The 
Dartmouth helicopter service (DHART) has also had an impact in our transport 
services, especially in the area of infant transport. 

Now, to summarize the activities of Upper Valley Ambulance. The primary focus for the 
ambulance service is to provide emergency transport services. We project a volume 
of 650 emergency responses from the eight-town area for the upcoming year. UVA 
continues to provide DHMC with transport services for their ICN and PICU. We 
expect to do 215 and 55 of these transports respectively. Also, we expect to do 350 
non-emergency transfers. UVA has had continuing success with a vigorous campaign 
to increase the volume of our non-emergency transfers. Of course, even though we 
are doing these non-emergency services, there is no compromise of the ambulance 
service to serve its primary mission of providing emergency services in the eight-town 
coverage area. 

We continue to use a mix of full-time and part-time paid ambulance personnel. The 
day to day operations of the ambulance service are being expertly managed by 
John Vose, Administrator, and Kevin Cole, Field Supervisor, who report directly to the 
committee of Town Directors who are appointed by the Selectmen of the towns. UVA 
has worked very hard to become a focal point for training for the local F.A.S.T. squads 
and Fire Departments in the region. We also train area residents in CPR. Last year, 
217 residents were trained. 

We have set some ambitious goals for 1998. It has been our goal since we started 
providing this service to deliver the highest level of emergency care possible. Two 
more of our full-time staff have enrolled in paramedic level training which allows the 



77 



administration of IV fluids, medications and advanced airway control. All of our staff 
are now trained in the use of defibrillation for heart attack victims. In addition, we will 
implement a Domicile Risk Assessment Program this year where our crews will go to 
the homes of the elderly citizens and assess their homes for potential fall hazards, and 
make recommendations for a safer home environment in the hopes of preventing an 
injury from occurring. 

As a resident of a member town, we strongly urge you to take advantage of our 
Subscription Service. The yearly membership fee of $35 entitles you to medically 
necessary Emergency Medical Services at no additional cost to you. Subscription 
applications are available at your local Town Offices, at Upper Valley Ambulance's 
Business Office in Fairlee, or area places of business. Call 802-333-4043 for further 
information. 

Larry A. Lancaster 
Chair, Board of Directors 



I 



78 



UPPER VALLEY LAKE SUNAPEE 
REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION 

The Upper Valley Lake Sunapee Regional Planning Commission (UVLSRPC) is a 
voluntary association of 31 towns. The Commission is concerned with the development 
of comprehensive plans for beneficial and balanced economic, environmental and 
social growth in the Region. It functions as a research, resource and informational 
agency and, when appropriate, acts to obtain Federal, State and other approvals, 
grants-in-aid, loans and similar assistance for individual member towns and for the 
Region. The Commission provides technical assistance to member communities in 
the areas of planning (land use, transportation, water quality, etc.), mapping, community 
development, grantsmanship and grant administration. In addition, regional studies 
such as our Regional Transportation Plan, and regional projects such as household 
hazardous waste collections and the Lake Sunapee and Connecticut River Scenic 
Byway Studies are undertaken to the benefit of more than one community. 

Our economic development program for communities in Grafton County has certainly 
grown this year! The program is fully staffed and funded for two years. In order to qualify 
for certain State funds, it was necessary to create a new organization, the Economic 
Development Corporation of the Upper Valley (EDCUV). Governed by its own board, 
EDCUV offers community development services, individualized business assistance, 
and a revolving loan fund, with financing available to businesses in the $15,000 to 
$50,000 range. 

In 1997, our work specifically for the Town of Orford included: 

• Provided circuit-riding planner to support work of the Planning Board. 

• Assisted Planning Board with developing amendments to the 
Subdivision Regulations. 

• Provided education statistics. 

• Discussed implementation of the Connecticut River Corridor Management Plan 
and Scenic Byways with the Planning Board. 

• Met with Board of Selectmen to discuss economic development needs in town. 

• Discussed RSA 155-E as it applies to the expansion of a grandfathered 
gravel pit. 

• Kept the town updated on potential grant funding sources. 

• Began update of two-page economic initiative summary to be made available 
on the Internet and in brochure form. 

• Maintained geographic information system data for Orford. 

Our Commission looks forward to serving Orford in the coming year. 



79 



VISITING NURSE ALLIANCE OF VERMONT AND NEW HAMPSHIRE, INC. 

We are very grateful for the continued support Orford provides to help VNA meet the 
home care and hospice needs of its community members. Here are some crucial 
points to consider regarding the importance of funding VNA programs in your town. 

• VNA services are available to persons of all ages and all economic means. 

• Hospital discharge planners and attending physicians work closely with VNA to 
decide a course of treatment for each home health care patient. 

• Our VNA staff from the Bradford Branch provides skilled services for people who: 

- are recovering from surgery, have an acute illness, or disability; 

- require long-term care; 

- need support and symptom control during a terminal illness. 

• Town funds help provide care for people who do not have adequate insurance or 
the ability to pay. 

Changes in health care systems nationally are placing the very heart of patient care 
responsibility in the hands of home care agencies. VNA is pleased to help ensure a 
health care safety net for the people of Orford. 

The following services were provided in the Town of Orford during the past year. 

Visits 7/1/96 -6/30/97 



Nursing 




1272 




Physical Therapy 




103 




Occupational Therapy 


10 




Social Services 




1 




Home Health Aide 




2162 




Homemaker 




215 






TOTAL 


3763 




Well Child Clinic: 


Unduplicated Children 17 




Visits 




23 




Dental Clinic 


Visits 


4 


Blood Pressure Screening Clinics: 


Attendance 




114 persons 


Flu Clinics: 


Attendance 




80 persons 


Family Support Services: 


Families 




1 




Individuals 




5 




Home Visits 




4 


Child Health Services: 


Home Visits 




12 




WIC Clients 




41 




Clinic Visits 




274 



i 



On behalf of the patients and families we serve, thank you for your continuing support. 

Elizabeth J. Davis, RN, MPH 
Chief Executive Officer 



80 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL REPORT 

It is a pleasure to report to the people of District One, which consists of 98 towns and 
four cities here in northern New Hampshire. The Council acts much like a board of 
directors at the very top of the Executive Branch of your New Hampshire State 
Government. We confirm gubernatorial nominations to many regulatory, advisory and 
governing boards and commissions within the Executive Branch of your government. 
We also confirm gubernatorial nominations to the entire Judicial Branch of the New 
Hampshire State Government, approve contracts to outside agencies, businesses, 
municipalities and individuals and a host of other duties. 

A good list of phone numbers for citizens to gain information throughout this district to 
have on hand would be the following: 

AIDS Hotline 1-800-752-AIDS 

Children, Youth & Families 1-800-852-3345 

Consumer Complaints, Utilities 1-800-852-3793 

Consumer Complaints, Insurance 1-800-852-3416 

Disabilities Assistance 1 -800-852-3345 

Elderly & Adult Assistance 1 -800-442-5640 

Fuel Assistance 1 -800-552-461 7 

Emergency Assistance 9-1-1 

Employment Opportunities 1 -800-852-3400 

Job Training Information 1-800-772-7001 

NH State Library 1 -800-499-1 232 

NH State Police 1-800-525-5555 

NH Tech. Community Colleges 1 -800-247-3420 

NH Help Line (24-hour) 1-800-852-3388 

NH Operation Game Thief 1 -800-344-4262 

NH Veterans Council 1 -800-622-9230 

NH Corrections Dept. 1-800-479-0688 

NH Dept. of Labor 1 -800-272-4353 

NH Housing Authority 1 -800-439-7247 

NH Higher Educational Ass't. 1 -800-525-2577 

Headrest Teenline 1 -800-826-3700 

NH Independent Living Found. 1-800-826-3700 

NH Charitable Foundation 1-800-464-6641 

It is a pleasure to work for you as one of your public servants. My office is at your service. 

Councilor Ray Burton 

RR1 Box 106 

Woodsville, NH 03785 

747-3662 

271-3632 (State House) 



81 



82 



Annual Report 
of the 

Orford School District 

Orford 

New Hampshire 

Fiscal Year July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997 



83 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

ORFORD SCHOOL BOARD 

Fiscal Year July 1 , 1 996 to June 30, 1 997 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

School District Organization 85 

Warrant for Annual Meeting, March 13, 1998 86 

Minutes of Annual Meeting, March 14, 1997 89 

Annual Report of the School Board Chair 96 

Annual Report of the Principal 97 

Annual Report of the Committee for Educational Partnership 99 

Comparative Yearly Enrollments 101 

Instructional Staff as of January 1 , 1998 102 

Auditors' Report 103 

SAD 22 Assessments 104 

Revenues and Expenditures, 1996-97, 1997-98, 1998-99 105 



84 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE ORFORD SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Orford, New Hampshire 

1997 



The School Board of the School District of Orford herewith submits its Annual Report. 

SCHOOL DISTRICT ORGANIZATION 
School Board 
Richard Dion, Vice-chair 
Jane Gardner-Duffany 
Bethany B. Miller, Chair 
Jonathan Sands, Secretary 
Sally Tomlinson 



Peter M. Thomson, Moderator 
Edna J. Adams, Clerk 
Edna J. Adams, Treasurer 



Term Expires 

1999 
2000 
1998 
1998 
2000 



1998 
1998 
1998 



Joseph Delia Badia, Superintendent 

Mary Ellen Gallagher, Assistant Superintendent 

William H. Moorman, Business Manager 

Sheila W. Moran, Principal 

M. Amos Kornfeld, Assistant Principal 



85 



SCHOOL DISTRICT WARRANT 
STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Grafton, S. S. School District of Orford 

To the inhabitants of the School District of Orford qualified to vote in District 
affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at Memorial Hall in said District on Friday, 
March 13, 1998 at 4:00 P.M. to act on the following subjects: 

ARTICLE 1: To choose by non-partisan ballot a Moderator, a Clerk, and a 
Treasurer, each to serve one year, two members of the School Board, each to serve 
three years, and one member of the School Board to serve one year. 

(POLLS WILL OPEN NO LATER THAN 4:00 P.M. AND WILL CLOSE NO EARLIER 
THAN 9:00 RM.) 

NOTE: ARTICLES 2 THROUGH 11 WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED UNTIL 7:00 RM. 

ARTICLE 2: To hear the Report of the Orford Committee for Educational 
Partnerships established at the Annual District Meeting on March 15, 1996. 

ARTICLE 3. To hear the Report of the Orford School Administrative Unit 
Withdrawal Study Committee. 

ARTICLE 4. To hear the Report of the Orford/Fairlee Interstate Planning 
Committee. 

ARTICLE 5. For 1997-98: To see if the District will raise and appropriate the 
sum of Six Thousand Five Hundred Dollars ($6.500.00) as a deficit appropriation, in 
addition to the 1997-98 appropriation, for the purpose of meeting unanticipated 
vocational education tuition, such sum to be made available to the District prior to June 
30, 1998. (The School Board recommends this appropriation.) 

ARTICLE 6. For 1997-98: To see if the District will vote to make the following 
Capital Reserve Fund changes: 

a) Discontinue the Gymnasium Floor Repair Capital Reserve Fund created in 
1991. Said funds, with accumulated interest to date of withdrawal, estimated to total 
approximately Twenty Seven Thousand Dollars ($27.000.00) are to be transferred to 
the school district's general fund. 



86 



b) Establish a Capital Reserve Fund under the provisions of RSA 35:1 for the 
purpose of architectural, legal, and consulting services in connection with the 
Orford/Fairlee Interstate study, and to raise and appropriate the sum of Fourteen 
Thousand Dollars ($14.000.00) from the 1997/98 general fund surplus, to be placed in 
this fund; and 

c) Establish a Capital Reserve Fund under the provisions of RSA 35:1 for the 
purpose of gymnasium floor repair, and to raise and appropriate the sum of Thirteen 
Thousand Dollars ($13.000.00) from the 1997/98 general fund surplus to be placed in 
this fund. (The School Board recommends this appropriation.) 

ARTICLE 7: To see if the School District will authorize the School Board to 
apply for, accept and expend, without further action of the School District Meeting, 
money from any source which becomes available during the fiscal year, provided that 
(1) Such money is used for legal purposes for which a school district may appropriate 
money, (2) The School Board holds a public hearing on the expenditure of such 
money before it is expended, (3) The expenditure of such money does not require the 
expenditure of other School District funds, and (4) The funds are exempt from all 
provisions of RSA 32 relative to limitation and expenditure of school district monies. 

ARTICLE 8: To see if the School District will determine and fix the salaries of 
school district officers as follows: school district treasurer $400.00; school district clerk 
$50.00; school district moderator $50.00. (The School Board recommends this 
action.) 

ARTICLE 9: To see if the Orford School District will vote to approve the cost 
items included in the collective bargaining agreement reached between the Orford 
School Board and the Orford Teachers Association, which calls for the following 
increases in salaries and benefits: 

Year Estimated Increase In 

Total Compensation 

1998/99 $38,432 (3.25%) 

1999/00 $48,789 (3.99%) 

These sums represent the additional costs attributable to the Increase in salaries and 
benefits over those of the appropriation at current staffing levels paid in the prior fiscal 
year. (The School Board recommends this appropriation.) 

ARTICLE 10: To see if the School District will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of Two Million. One Hundred Forty Six Thousand Seven Hundred Sixty-four 
Dollars $2.146.764.00) for the payment of salaries for School District officials and 
agents and for the payment of statutory obligations of the District for the 1998-99 fiscal 
year. (The School Board recommends this appropriation.) 



87 



ARTICLE 11 : To transact any other business that may legally come before this 
meeting. 

Given under our hands and seals at said Orford this third day of February, 1998. 



Richard Dion, Vice Chair Bethany B. Miller, Chair 

Jane Gardner-Duffany Jonathan Sands, Secretary 

Sally Tomlinson 

School Board, 

School District of Orford 



NOTE: Due to printing schedules for the Orford Town Report, this Warrant does not | 
include petitioned articles which might be presented for inclusion in the official Warrant 
which will be posted and advertised. 



88 



ORFORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 
COUNTY of GRAFTON 

ANNUAL SCHOOL DISTRICT MEETING 
MARCH 14, 1997 



The meeting was called order at 4:00 by Moderator Peter Thomson. The ballot 
Clerks were sworn in and the ballots counted, (558) after which the polls remained 
opened for balloting. At 7:00, the Moderator called the meeting to order and 
immediately a motion was made by Richard Dion and seconded by Janice Grady: "to 
recess the Annual School District Meeting to Friday March 21, 1997 at 7 P.M. (time 
certain) because of the inclement weather". The motion carried with a voice vote 
without a negative response by the handful of people present. 

A second motion made by Richard Dion and seconded by Janice Grady was made 
to recess balloting as well and to reopen the balloting at 7 P.M. (time certain) on March 
21, 1997. 

This motion also passed with a voice vote. The ballots were resealed, the ballot 
box remained locked and was transported to the vault at the Selectmen's office by the 
Chief of Police and Moderator Peter Thomson. Meeting recessed at 7:05. 

MARCH 21, 1997 

The recessed meeting was called to order at 7:00 P.M. by Moderator Peter 
Thomson with a salute to the Flag. 

The first order of business was an explanation of the recess --weather - and the 
procedure leading up to the recess which included several phone calls made by 

Bethany Miller with SAU, Peter Thomson and the Secretary of State's office. 

Mud Season yard Sale to benefit the Building & Grounds will be held on 
Saturday, March 22 from 9-2. 

The Booster Club is in need of help running bingo on Wednesday evenings. 
Call Jerry Washburn or Terre Mitchell. 

Thanks to Nancy Thatcher and Bob Thatcher and to Principal Berliner for the 
spaghetti supper served to the supervisors, ballot clerks, Moderator and School Clerk 
on March 14. it was greatly appreciated by us all. 

The Committee to study the withdrawal from SAU is in need of members. 
Anyone interested, please contact Moderator Thomson. (This committee is the result 
of the special meeting held in January in which the majority voted to study the 
withdrawal.) 

Bethany Miller expressed appreciation to the volunteers who have serviced the 
school in many areas over the past year. A round of applause was given as those 
volunteers stood to be recognized. 

The Certificate of the posting of the warrant was read by Moderator Thomson 
after which a Motion by Pat Hammond and Seconded by Mark Blanchard to dispense 
with the reading of the warrant was passed with a voice vote. 



89 



ARTICLE 1 : To choose by non-partisan ballot a Moderator, a Clerk, and a Treasurer, 
each to serve one year, one member of the School Board to serve one year and two 
members of the School Board to serve three years. 

Polls opened at 7 P.M. and remained open until 9:27. The results of the balloting was 
announced after all other business was finished 



ARTICLE 2: To hear the report of the Orford Committee for Educational partnerships 
established at the Annual District Meeting on March 15, 1996. 

Motion: Richard Dion 
Second: Bethany Miller 

Action: The following report was read by Judith Parker: 

The Orford Committee for Educational partnership (OCEP) was created at last 
year's School District Meeting to "explore, negotiate and endorse a plan for an 
educational partnership with neighboring towns..." OCEP began its work against a 
background of considerable change and uncertainty surrounding high school 
education in the Upper Valley region. As area high schools are reaching capacity, 
towns without high schools, such as Lyme, Piermont, Fairlee and Strafford, are seeing 
their choices diminish and possibly vanish altogether 

After considerable deliberation, the committee chose to begin reaching out at 
the grass roots level. We identified individuals active in education in the Towns of 
Fairlee, Lyme, Piermont, Thetford and Strafford and invited them to form with us, an 
intertown committee, the CEE, to plan a conference for the fall of 1996 to address 
regional educational concerns. The purpose of the conference, CROSSING 
BOUNDARIES, BUILDING BRIDGES-THE NURTURING OF EDUCATION IN THE 
UPPER VALLEY, was to meet people in neighboring communities, find common 
educational concerns, and build upon that for continued joint exploration of ways to 
enhance regional educational opportunities. Participants were selected to represent a 
cross section of each town, OCEP raised $1600 from area banks, businesses, the 
Niles Foundation, and the U.N.H. Public Conversations Project to unden^^rite the costs 
of the conference. Bruce Mallory, director of the Public Conversations Project worked 
with the CEE to help plan and facilitate the conference. 

Participants were asked the questions "What aspects of education in your 
community would you like to preserve and what would you like to change?" At the end 
of a fruitful discussion, the Conference arrived at the following concerns: 

Maintain ahd strengthen involvement of all parents in school affairs; 

Maintain and strengthen community support 

Ensure diversity of economic, social and political orientation 

Ensure that choice/options are taken into consideration when considering 

school policy and/or structure; 
To the extent possible, seek stability of funding 



90 



Maintain class size consistent with the objective of providing the best instruction 

for the student. 
Ensure adequacy of physical plant and the necessary tools for teaching. 
Encourage pooling and sharing of resources among communities 
In curriculum, ensure that there is; 

Breadth, diversity and challenge for ALL students 

Development of citizenship 

Responsive curriculum 

Development of reading, writing and other skills to enhance literacy. 

Development of math and science 

Development of music and the arts. 

While the conference did not address the specific issues facing Orford High School, It 
provided OCEP and the attendees from other towns the beginning of a network of 
individuals ready to think about more regional solutions to education. 

Following the conference, members of OCEP continued to meet with the CEE, 
and currently a working group of that committee is researching successful multi-town 
educational collaborations and will be developing a proposal for a regional meeting of 
school boards in the near future. We also held smaller, informal meetings with school 
board members in Lyme, Piermont and Fairlee. 

Lyme is not currently interested in a partnership with Orford. Their focus is 
primarily on a Hanover solution to the diminishing High School choices available to 
them. They are interested in being informed as things develop within our 
conversations with other towns. 

OCEP members have also met with the Administration and School Board Chair 
In Piermont to keep them informed of what we are doing and to ascertain what level of 
interest they may have in partnerships. While Piermont is currently committed to high 
school choice, there is interest in exploring the possibility of program partnerships on 
the middle school level. 

Discussions with Fairlee have progressed quickly on two parallel tracks. After 
several informal meetings with Rebecca Holcomb, principal and Allen Avery, School 
Board Chair, OCEP received a letter indicating Fairlee's interest in pursuing possible 
secondary school partnership and also interest in "exploring ways to take advantage 
of our combined resources at the elementary level to see if we can provide all of our 
students with a richer program". Discussions have already moved forward with the 
elementary/middle school partnership possibilities with an anticipated start in the Fall 
of 1997. 

On February 27, Fairlee School Board scheduled a meeting for members of 
the Fairlee community to present high school options and have a preliminary 
discussion of their hopes and values related to this issue. In addition to the open 
discussion, a written survey was taken. The majority of those in attendance favored a 



91 



high school option including Orford. (Cicely Richardson) 

OCEP anticipates that with the seating of our new school board after the District 
meeting, both towns will be prepared to begin substantive discussions on high school 
partnership. We feel that a number of circumstances have created a unique window of 
opportunity available to us to address serious educational Issues in both Fairlee and 
Orford. Orford needs to stabilize its financial base for education funding and to 
Improve and expand the educational options available to its middle and high school 
students. In addition to high school issues, Fairlee is facing a serious problem with 
classroom space in the elementary / middle school population and wishes to make 
decisions regarding construction of new school space in conjunction with resolving its 
high school question. 

As we enter discussions with Fairlee, we need to understand that a partnership 
does not mean the status quo with Fairlee now attached. Partnership means a 
mutually derived educational philosophy and curriculum, shared governance, and 
educational solutions that are affordable to both towns. In our initial conversations we 
have been very excited about the possibilities-ways to be more creative in the design 
of staff and curriculum, use of community resources and even broader regional 
partnerships as part of a long term plan, while still maintaining a small school that 
operates on a human scale. This is an exciting time with many possibilities. It will also 
mean change which can sometimes feel awkward and cause anxiety. Orford High 
School has always been ours, a partnership means that It will now be somebody 
else's school as well. 

Members of the committee who attended 129 meetings were: 

Emily Bryant, Judy Dion, Susan Turpin, Tekle Tomlinson, Barb Dyke and Marty 
Duffany. 

Bethany Miller made the motion to accept the report. Seconded by Janice Grady. 
Report was accepted with a voice vote in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE 3: The School District voted to authorize the School Board to apply for, 
accept and expend, without further action of the School District Meeting, money from 
any source which becomes available during the fiscal year, provided that ( 1 ) Such 
money is used for legal purposes for which a school district may appropriate money, 
( 2 ) The School Board holds a public hearing on the expenditure of such money 
before it is expended, ( 3 ) The expenditure of such money does not require the 
expenditure of other School District funds, and ( 4 ) The funds are exempt from all 
provisions of RSA 32 relative to limitation and expenditure of school district monies. 

MOTION: Richard Dion 

SECOND: Bethany Miller 

ACTION: Voice vote in the affirmative. 

Note: Sheila Perry asked for an explanation of the article which the Board explained 
as "a housekeeping " procedure. 



92 



ARTICLE 4: To see if the School District will reauthorize the Committee to study the 
advisability of withdrawing from School Administrative Unit #22 which Committee was 
originally authorized by vote of the District on January 14, 1997. 

MOTION: Bethany Miller 

SECOND: Richard Dion 

ACTION: Question from Pat Hammond that if there is no interest to serve on the 

committee would it be necessary to pursue. The Moderator asked for volunteers and 

said that the committee would pursue. 

Terre Mitchell asked if this would affect the partnership pursuit with area towns. 

Bethany Miller - that the two committees would inform each other and all action 
should run on parallel tracks. 

ARTICLE 5: Vote in the affirmative that the School District will determine and fix the 
salaries of school district officers as follows: school district treasurer $400.00: school 
district clerk $50.00: school district moderator $50.00 ( The School Board 
recommends this action. ) 

MOTION: David Bischoff 
SECOND: Paul Goundry 
ACTION: Voice vote in the affirmative 

ARTICLE 6: To see if the School District will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
TWO MILLION FIVE THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED EIGHTY SEVEN DOLLARS 
($2,005,587.00 ) for the payment of salaries for School District officials and agents and 
for payment of statutory obligations of the District for the 1997-98 fiscal year. ( The 
School Board recommends this action. ) 

The amount in the original article as printed on the warrant was changed to 
$2,018,892.00 because of last minute adjustments in State Aid and Insurance. 

MOTION: Richard Dion 

SECOND: Bethany Miller 

ACTION: All who expressed their concerns for the cuts complimented the board and 

the budget committee for the conscientious job done. Tim Dyke & John O'Brien 

expressed concern that the proposed elimination of grade school sport coaches and 

officials could be of concern to area schools who are interested in the "partnership". 

Toni Pease showed concern about the elimination of funds for the Army Engineers and 

the free labor that we have received. 

Mr. Berliner explained that there is "no emergency " in the work to be done by the 

engineers and that they would continue at a later date. 

John O'Brien made the motion to increase the amount to be raised by $20,000.00 

(TWENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS) making a total to be raised ($2,038,892.00) 

TWO MILLION THIRTY-EIGHT THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED NINETY TWO 

DOLLARS and let the Board and the Principal decide to which programs it should be 

applied. 



93 



SECOND by Sheila Perry 

A paper ballot was cast on the amendment. 

Total cast 125 YES 69 NO 56 

The amended motion was passed with a voice vote in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE 7: Shall we adopt the provisions of RSA 194-B, implementing a charter and 
open enrollment school program? (Inserted by Petition.) 

MOTION: DougTifft 
SECOND: Sue Kirscher 

Richard Dion made the motion to amend the motion to read "to continue to 
study" instead of "adopt". His motion seconded by David Bischoff. 

Doug Tifft explained that there really wasn't time to execute an application 
before the April first deadline which prompted Richard Dion to make the amendment in 
order to leave the door open for the Board to pursue as a option. 

ACTION: A voice vote In the affirmative on the amendment. A voice vote in the 
affirmative on the amended motion. 

9:27 The Moderator declared the ballot box closed 

ARTICLE 8: Shall no more than percent of the district's current pupil enrollment be 
eligible for tuition to attend charter and open enrollment schools located outside the 
school district? (Inserted by petition) 

MOTION: Motion to pass over this article was made by Richard Dion 
SECOND: Kathy Baker 
Voice vote in the affirmative. 

ARTICLE 9: Shall no more than percent of the district's current pupil enrollment be 
eligible for the tuition to attend charter and open enrollment schools located inside the 
school district? (Inserted by petition) 

MOTION: Richard Dion made the motion to pass over 

SECOND: Kathy Baker 

ACTION: Voice vote in the affirmative 

ARTICLE 10: To transact any other business that may legally come before this 
meeting. 

Mr. Berliner presented a floral arrangement to Janice Grady in appreciation of 
her service on the Board. 



94 



Mr. LeBarron presented a floral arrangement to Sherri Tullar for her years of 
service on the board. 

Barb Dyke expressed appreciation for the help and cooperation from the Board 
and the Administration in the Partnership quest. 

Bethany Miller thanked Janice and Sherri and also Laurel Berwick who served 
for two years on the Board. She also recognized the OM teams who are going on to 
State competition. 

Judith Parker encouraged participating in support of the school. 

Maple Week-end is being held and the Moderator invited everyone to visit a 
sugar house. Gerald Pease requested that you bring your own sap! 

The results of the balloting was announced: 

Board Member for one year: Jon Sands had 106 votes. Each of the following had one 
vote: Dennis Johnston, Harold Taylor, Linda Gordon, Larry Taylor, Laurie Raines and 
Judy Pushee. 

Board member three years -two elected 

Jane Gardner-Duffany had 94 votes: Sally Tomlinson had 98 votes. Each of the 
following had one vote: Paul Messer, Judy Franklin, Marion Spottswood, Kathy Baker, 
Paul Dalton, Brenda Thomson, Althea Goundry, Jane Hebb 

Clerk for one year: 

Edna J. Adams had 107 votes, 3 votes for Deb Matyka, 1 vote for Judy Franklin 

Moderator for one year: 

Peter M. Thomson had 111 votes, Jeff Gordon had one vote 

Treasurer for one year: 

Edna J. Adams had 108 votes. Deb Matyka had 4 votes 

Those officers being present were sworn in by Moderator Thomson. 

Meeting adjourned at 9:40 P.M. 

A true record, attest. 

(signed ) A true copy of record, attest Edna J. Adams. 



95 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL BOARD CHAIR 

This past year has been one of notable progress. Our Inexperience as a board 
served as both a burden and a blessing as we approached new hurdles with few 
preconceived ideas about the way things should be done. We are all now in a pivotal 
time that demands innovation. 

The School Board took steps toward improving the efficiency and effectiveness of 
Its work. It held a retreat to develop board goals and a training workshop with the New 
Hampshire School Boards Association to focus on effective board operations. A board 
mission statement and board goals were defined and adopted. Board members 
served on committees to: recruit a new principal, negotiate a new teacher contract, 
study the SAU withdrawal issues, and plan for a potential Interstate district with 
Falrlee. The latter involves feasibililty and facilities studies as well as educational 
design and Articles of Agreement with Falrlee on issues such as finance, organization 
and governance. While the work has seemed at times ponderous, it is vital to push 
forward during this time of providential opportunity 

The School Board is working with community members and educators to develop 
a forward-looking plan for our educational system. We have welcomed thoughtful 
initiatives brought In by new administrators this past year. We were fortunate to have 
Sheila Moran join us as Principal, bringing us her educational vision and appreciation 
for rural communities. Many volunteers have contributed their time and resources to 
our school. Both faculty and community can be proud of their combined commitment 
to improving our school system with the limited resources of a small town. At the same 
time, we recognize that we cannot continue to maintain our current educational 
structure indefinitely. We must continue working toward partnerships with other towns 
to create schools that are more affordable and better equipped to meet future 
instructional needs. The potential formation of an interstate district with Falrlee holds 
the most promise for meeting these objectives while allowing Orford to retain some of 
the benefits of local education and control. It will require more hard work, embracing 
change, deciding what we can preserve and what we must leave behind, investment 
of civic energy and financial support. Constructive public engagement in this project 
can ensure a sustainable, high-quality educational institution that our citizens can 
benefit from and proudly support for years to come. 

Meanwhile, as we transition toward this, we still have to face some difficult 
financial realities to maintain the programs we have now. Financial planning and 
development of a capital funding program are areas that will need more focus at this 
time. Additionally, we will need to examine how to provide supervisory services after 
our contract with the new SAU 70 ends in July 1999. I ask that the people of Orford 
continue to support their schools as it implements changes toward a new model, and 
that they take the time to be informed and involved. The quality of communities and 
schools is made and sustained by citizens taking an active role. We are grateful to all 
those who have Invested their time and energy in shaping the future, and we Invite 
others to join In the work. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Bethany B. Miller, Chair 



96 



Principal's Report 

I am honored to be writing my first Principal's Report to the citizens of Orford. 
There are monumental changes in the life of the Orford School. In fact, it is a time of 
great change for public schools all across the country and I find it helpful to think about 
some of our challenges and opportunities from this perspective. For example, on this 
day in January when I am writing this report, I hear the news that Vermont has 
reversed itself on the subject of school consolidation. That state had mandated that 
small schools be closed in favor of larger, more cost effective consolidated schools. 
The evidence, however, that small but financially viable schools are better for students 
and their communities is mounting. The people of Orford are to be commended for 
understanding instinctively that it is worth struggling to achieve both fiscal viability and 
the sort of healthy connections attainable in a relatively small, community-based 
school. 

What changes are in progress? Our current School Administrative Unit, SAD 
22, is unraveling. On July 1 of this year Lyme and Orford, the district's two small 
cousins, will be on their own. We will continue for one year, and one year only, to 
contract equivalent services from the new SAD being formed by Hanover and the 
Dresden District. Lyme and Orford are also proceeding toward withdrawing from the 
SAU, Lyme to continue on its own and Orford to seek a new alliance that is both 
financially sound and educationally meaningful. The particular alliance that both 
excites and challenges us is a possible Fairlee-Orford interstate K-12 school distric!. 
Such a school district would assure us of the fiscal viability we so badly need by 
increasing our economy of scale with a larger pool of secondary students. From an 
educational point of view it would reconstitute a slightly larger community out of two 
river towns that once were all but one before state and school district boundaries 
artificially divided them. It will be for the two towns to decide whether they want to 
bring this interstate district into existence. 

Students and teachers are involving themselves in these changes by working 
on committees, defining what we expect of our graduates, looking critically at 
curriculum and instructional practices, and adjusting responsibly to the painful aspects 
of reform. We are striving to strengthen certain programs that promise to put the Orford 
School on the map as a destination for potential tuition students. Mind you we are not 
there yet. We are seeing, in the short run, a serious loss in tuition students, partly 
because of the uncertainty around the future of the Orford School and, we are told , 
because of students who want a larger, more diverse athletics program. The exciting 
initiatives which will, eventually, be building blocks in a new image of our school 
include both technology education and the greenhouse/environmental education 
program. These both grew out of a community School-to-Work program which is 
designed to bring the academic lives of students closer to the realities of the work 
place. Our particular interpretation of this charge is that students growing up In rural 
places must learn not only skills to get a job, but skills to create jobs so they might live 
wherever they want, Including Orford. The single largest export from rural America 
today Is its young people. We are hoping to reverse this trend, while at the same time 
developing an academic program that is second to none and connected with the wide 
world of national and international intellectual, artistic and commercial life. 



97 



Our state assessment results this year are particularly gratifying. With an on-site 
curriculum coordinator who was able to analyze previous test results with an eye 
toward targeted improvement, we were able to see significant improvements. Of the 
three grades tested, our tenth and third grade results were particularly satisfying 
because they were above the state average in virtually every category. I would be 
happy to share comparative data with anyone who might be interested. 

We have had considerable success, thanks to our busy grants committee, in 
obtaining additional support for our technology program. A "Technology Literacy 
Challenge Grant" from the state doubled the number of computers in our computer lab 
and allowed us to wire the lab for whole class internee access. A private donation 
again increased the number of computers and Phase II of the state grant would enable 
us to develop internee accessible computing centers in all elementary classrooms. 

To support the greenhouse initiative we are making plans for K-6 classroom 
gardens and, eventually, natural habitats in the hope that this work will help the 
children appreciate the way of life that grew up around cultivating the earth. This will 
be done with community members, and especially with elders who themselves know 
the value of working and protecting the earth. We are also developing with Antloch 
Graduate School a CoSeed team which will involve older students In meaningful 
decisions In the life of the school and community, decisions which would have an 
impact on the long-term sustainability of Orford as a place where people want to live. 

In the meantime school continues. Young children learn to read and compute. 
Older students learn to take responsibility for the world into which they are growing. 
Along the way they learn respect and how to listen. If any of you would like to be a part 
of the life of this wonderful school, please give me a call. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Sheila W. Moran, Principal 



98 



ORFORD COMMITTEE FOR EDUCATIONAL PARTNERSHIP 

SUMMARY REPORT 
MARCH 1998 

'The aim of education must be to develop individuals who are open to change. Only 
such persons can constructively meet the perplexities of a world in which problems 
spawn much faster than their answers. The goal of education must be to develop a 
society in which people can live more comfortably with change than with rigidity. In the 
coming world the capacity to face the new appropriately Is more Important than the 
ability to know and repeat the old." 

Carl Rogers: Freedom to Learn 

The Orford Committee for Educational Partnership (OCEP) was established at the 
1996 Annual School District meeting to. .."explore, negotiate and endorse a plan for an 
educational partnership with neighboring towns..." in Warrant Article 3. 

During our two year mandate, OCEP has accomplished the following: 
defined an approach to the task given us by the town, 
identified individuals in surrounding towns interested in exploring the idea of 
inter-town educational partnerships. 

formed an inter-town committee, the Committee for Educational Exploration 
(CEE), to design a conference that would begin a dialogue between residents 
of Orford and neighboring towns of Fairlee, Lyme, Piermont, Strafford, Thetford, 
and Warren. 

raised $1 ,600.00 from area businesses to fund a conference-Crossing 
Boundaries.. .Building Bridges, held in September 1996 at the Hulbert Outdoor 
Center 

Initiated contacts with School Board representatives from Fairlee, Lyme, 
Piermont, and Thetford. 

Two major avenues of activity evolved from the Conference. First, OCEP launched into 
discussions with Fairlee that subsequently developed into the formation of the 
Interstate Compact Committee. Second, we have identified an interest in surrounding 
communities to continue exploration of regional educational partnerships. 

In 1997, the newly created Interstate Compact Committee (ICC) assumed a major 
portion of the charge to OCEP in Warrant Article 3. Statutes from Vermont and New 
Hampshire define the committee's membership and its charge. OCEP, however, has 
continued to participate in the process through attendance at ICC meetings and in an 
advisory capacity to the Orford delegation. 

After much discussion in our committee, OCEP chose not to actively pursue 
partnerships with other towns to concentrate on developing the partnership with 
Fairlee. We believe this is a critical, first viable arrangement that will enable Fairlee 
and Orford to have a high quality, affordable education system for all of our children, 
kindergarten through twelfth grade. OCEP believes that we will continue to pursue 



99 



educational partnerships with other towns once an interstate school district with 
Fairlee has been formalized. 

OCEP recommends the following to the Orford School Board: 

Endorse the Orford/Fairlee Interstate Compact as a unique opportunity to 
assess and design a high quality affordable school system that will meet the 
educational needs of our children in a rapidly changing society. 
Establish a committee to continue pursuing educational partnerships with 
neighboring towns which will enhance educational opportunities for our 
students: e.g. 

create a school consortium of the Upper Valley 

share resources. 

identify social, cultural, intellectual spheres around which communities 

in the Upper Valley can build together and create new relationships with 

each other. 
Establish working groups to facilitate multi-town forums of the school boards to 
discuss mutual educational issues. 

Recognize the benefits of, and find ways to foster community involvement in 
education. 

Promote clear, ongoing communication among the town, school, and 
school board and develop mechanisms to achieve this goal e.g. 

periodic roundtable discussions or forums. 

a quarterly town newsletter including reports of committees; items 

of interest and editorials. 

OCEP strongly recommends to the town of Orford 

We are convinced that the best schools are those in which the town is actively 
involved. We have observed the results of increased community involvement In our 
schools and strongly recommend that the citizens of the town continue and even 
increase their involvement through service on committees, School Board, Booster 
Club, volunteering in the classroom, sharing special talents and skills, etc. 



I 



Respectfully submitted. 



Jude Parker, Chair 



Orford Committee for. Educational Partnership 

Jude Parker, Chair 

Judith D. Dion, Vice-chair 

Martin Duffany, Secretary 

Emily Bryant 

Barbara Dyke 

Tekle Tomlinson 

Susan Turpin 



100 






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101 



ORFORD SCHOOL DISTRICT 



INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF AS OF JANUARY 1, 1998 



Anna D. Alden 
Richard J. Barsotti 
Gary E. Barton 
Sharen T. Conner 
Barbara D. Conroy 
M. Bridget Fariel 

Lauren M. Fiekers 
Karen J. Fryer 
Phyllis A. Hanley 
Bonnie L. Harris 
Joy Leiand Harden 
Michael Ivanoski 
Susan B. Klin 
Roberta W. Kcer 
Theresa L. Langley 
Richard D. Newton 
Amy A. Nickerson 
Deborah T O'Brien 
Charles L. Papirmeister 
Eric O. Reichert 
Barbara H. Smith 
Joseph L. Stallsmith 
Karen L. Strickling 
Kristen A. Surprenant 
Nancy T. H. Thatcher 
Robert M. Thatcher 
Roberta L. Traub 
Olga T. Valencia 
Elmer Ward 



Music, Choral & Drama 

Science Grades 9-12 

Grade 3 

Special Education 7-12 

Grade 5 

Social Studies Grades 9-12 and 

Curriculum Coordinator Grades K-12 

French 

Grade 4 

Business Education 

Mathematics and Science 7 & 8 

Art K-12 

English & Social Studies Grades 7 & 8 

Grade 2 

English and Spanish 9-12 

Grade 1 

Physical Education K-8 

Media Generalist 

Kindergarten & Reading Recovery 

Technology Coordinator 

English 

Mathematics 

Guidance 

School Psychologist 

Social Studies 9-12 

Home Economics 7-12 

Physical Education 9-12 

Special Education K-6 

Grade 6 

Industrial Arts 



102 



DUE TO PRINTING SCHEDULES FOR THE ORFORD TOWN REPORT, THE 
AUDITORS' REPORT FOR THE 1996-97 FISCAL YEAR IS NOT INCLUDED 
HERE. COPIES WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE AT THE ANNUAL SCHOOL 
DISTRICT MEETING MARCH 13. 



103 



SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE UNIT 22 

REPORT OF ADMINISTRATIVE ASSESSMENTS 

1997-98 

District Assessments Percent Amount 

Hanover 23.169 $ 171,303 

Norwich 17.753 131,259 

Dresden 41.233 304,861 

Lyme 10.213 75,511 

Orford 7.632 56,428 

TOTAL 100% $ 739,362 

Revenues from Other Sources 46.848 

SAU 22 OPERATING BUDGET $ 786,210 



104 



ORFORD SCHOOL DISTRICT 

REVENUES 





1996/97 


1997/98 


1997/98 


1997/98 


1998/99 


CATB30RY 


TOTAL YEAR 


ORIGINAL 


REVISED 


TOTAL YEAR 


PFOPOSa) 




ACTUAL 


ESTIMATE 


BUDGET 


ESTIMATE 


BUDGET 



Balance Carry-Forward 



43,822 



10,000 



33,513 



33.513 



Local Sources: 
Approp. for Operating Budget 

Tuition 

Other Local Sources: 
Checking Acct Interest 
Trust Fund Income 
Gate Receipts 
Insurance Refunds 
Sale of Instructional Services 
Rent & misc. 



,480,241 


1,525,638 


1,487,667 


1,487,667 


1.594,638 


432,136 


450,824 


443,600 


457.383 


406.850 


5.699 


3,500 


4.000 


3.088 


4,000 





50 


50 








1.216 


1,000 


1.000 


1.000 


1.000 


9.920 


6,000 


6,000 


6,000 


6.000 











19.900 


21,000 














100 



Total Other Local Sources 



16.835 



10,550 



11,050 



29,988 



32.100 



State Sources: 
Foundation Aid 
Building Aid 
Catastrophic Aid 
Kindergarten Aid 
Vo Tech Tuit/Transp 



29,523 


11,880 


23.312 


29,381 


51.456 


19,500 


19.500 


19,500 


19.500 


19.500 

















6,500 





9,750 


9.750 


9.750 


8,747 


10.000 


10,000 


13,541 


32.470 



Total State Sources 



64,270 



41,380 



62.562 



72.172 



113.176 



Federal Sources: 
Dept of Agric. Grant 
Medicaid 



491 

361 




500 





500 



Total Federal Sources 



852 



500 



500 



TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET 



2,038.156 



2,038,892 



2.038,892 



2.080.723 



2.146,764 



I 



105 



ORFORD SCHOOL DISTRICT 
EXPENOrrURE BUDGET 





1996/97 


1997/98 


1997/98 


1997/98 


1998/99 




TOTAL YEAR 


APPROVED 


REVISE? 


TOTAL YEAR 


PROPOSaD 


DESCRIPrraN 


ACTUAL 


BUDGET 


BUDGET 


ESTIMATE 


BUDGET 



REGULAR INSTRUCTION: 

Teacher Salaries - Instructional 

Local Remedial Services 

Ed Asst Salaries - Instructional 

Substitutes 

Supplies 

Books 

Equipment 

Copier Expenses 

Contracted Service, Repairs, etc 

Voc School Tuition 

TOTAL REGULAR INSTRUCTION 

SPECIAL EDUCATION: 

Teacher Salaries - Spec Ed 
Ed Asst Salaries - Spec Ed 
Speech Therapy Salaries 
Contracted Special Ed Services 
Spec Ed Tuition 
Other Spec Ed Expenses 

TOTAL SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Co-curricular/Athletics 

Health Services (Nurse, etc) 

Guidance Books, Supplies, Ass't 

Staff Development 

Curriculum Development 

Library Books, Supplies, Ass't, etc 

DISTRICT ADMINISTRATION: 

SAU Central Office Assessment 
Other District Admin Expenses 

TOTAL DISTRICT ADMIN 



836.721 


841.006 


845.373 


854,004 


899,116 


9.902 


13.041 


13,931 


13,931 


13,931 


10,678 


9.274 


9,432 








8.559 


10.500 


10.500 


12,139 


11.000 


27,006 


15,005 


13,630 


15.438 


20.225 


17,661 


9.809 


10,981 


10.865 


11.570 


7,727 


9.000 


9,370 


9.731 


13.180 


8.428 


9,000 


9.000 


8,524 


10.000 


1,322 


3,800 


4.240 


4,210 


4.560 


16.200 


14,800 


14,800 


41,800 


39,000 


944,204 


935,235 


941,257 


970.642 


1.022,582 



82,453 


83.594 


83.594 


83.913 


88,951 


50,990 


32.960 


33.521 


58.320 


64,113 


19,901 


24,252 


24.252 


28.808 


26.745 


18,170 


21.700 


21,700 


15.641 


19.200 


2,495 


2,916 


2,916 


1.600 





1,876 


1,500 


1,500 


1.521 


2.050 


75,885 


166,922 


167,483 


189.803 


201.059 


32,183 


25.113 


31,581 


29.472 


32.777 


14.128 


13.866 


14,866 


14,307 


16,943 


3.711 


3.382 


4,022 


3.965 


3,323 


9.049 


11.200 


11,200 


12,259 


13,800 


41 


1.000 


500 


500 


1.000 


12.150 


12,267 


7.620 


7,360 


3,580 



63,228 


56,428 


56,428 


56.428 


52.656 


14,062 


9,034 


14,034 


12.844 


8,650 



77.290 



65,462 



70.462 



69.272 



61.306 



106 



ORFORD SCHOOL WSTRICT 

EXPSNomms budget 





1996/97 


1997/98 


1997/98 


1997/98 


1998/99 




TOTAL YEAR 


APPROVED 


REVBED 


TOTAL YEAR 


PROPOSED 


DESCRIPnON 


ACTUAL 


BUX3ET 


BUDGET 


ESTIMATE 


BUDGET 



SCHOOL ADMINfSTTIATlON: 

Pnndpal's Salary 

Asst Principal's Salary 

School Secretary's Salary 

Telephone 

Salary Increase pool - non-union 

Other School Admin. Expenses 

TOTAL SCHOOL AOMIN 

EMPLOYEE BENERTS: 

Medical Insurance 
Dental Insurance 
Social Security 
Life Insurance 
Disability Insurance 
Workers' Comp Insurance 
Retirement 
Unemployment 

TOTAL EMPLOYEE BENEFITS 

CUSTODIAL/MAINTENANCE: 

Custodial Salaries 

Custodial Overtime/Subs/Summer 

Contracted Maintenance Services 

Property/Liability Insurance 

Electricity 

Heat 

Other Plant Operation Expense 

TOTAL PLANT OPERATIONS 

Pupil Transportation 
Food Service Subsidy 
Site & BIdgs / Capital Outlay 
Debt Service 

GRAND TOTAL BUDGET 



55,886 


56.100 


56.100 


53.946 


55.000 


17,529 


17,117 


17.408 


17.631 


18.581 


27.148 


27.148 


29,609 


29.211 


29.211 


7,296 


9,000 


9.000 


7.590 


7.600 





3.000 








6.450 


14,607 


27,875 


11,250 


11.603 


11.005 



122,466 



140,240 



123.367 



119.981 



127.847 



132,577 


149,367 


149.367 


158.677 


149.564 


18.944 


20,246 


20.246 


22.351 


24.435 


90,132 


90,797 


90.797 


92.524 


98,050 


1,539 


1,512 


1.512 


1.494 


1.512 


320 


576 


576 


661 


696 


8.981 


11.652 


11.652 


8.201 


9,120 


26,362 


33.374 


33.374 


35.877 


37,676 


3,119 


3,669 


3.669 


3,035 


2.935 


271,974 


311.193 


311.193 


322.820 


323,988 



50,255 


48,778 


49.607 


47,158 


47,158 


7,476 


9,135 


9.135 


8,825 


7.000 


10,289 


14,000 


14.000 


14,876 


15.000 


11,035 


11,000 


11.000 


10.446 


11,000 


22,237 


20,500 


20.500 


20.051 


23,500 


13,198 


14,000 


14.000 


•13.197 


14.000 


14,476 


16.930 


16.930 


16.039 


15,460 


128,966 


134.343 


135.172 


130,592 


133.118 


93,594 


101.200 


102.200 


98.277 


92.400 

















6,234 


4.000 


4.500 


4.500 


4.000 


112,767 


113.469 


113.469 


113.469 


109.041 


2.004.642 


2,038,892 


2.038.892 


2.087.219 


2.146.764 



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